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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Great to hear from you Tony. Is it sharp as a tack? How well does it work in low light (no flash here!)?
    Hi Nicole good to hear your after that natural light LOL It's not as razor sharp as a Nikon but close enough for people shooting where for me a lens can be too sharp. The auto-focus works very well in low light on my F100 and it's ergonomic for manual focus if you prefer. I find it's better to set the auto-focus through the center of the lens and then recompose to nail the shot in low light. This only takes a fraction of a second and I can't remember any shots that I've missed with it. You will get a lot for your money and hand on heart I don't think any 3rd paty lens is as good as the real thing.

  2. #32
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Thanks Tony!

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    no flash here!
    Awwwwww.....Come on....blow those 1000 watts flash heads directly at the little kids!

  4. #34

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    Morten I've told ye before ... it's rude to flash

  5. #35
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    Nicole,
    For portraiture, I nearly always use a Nikon 85mm f1.8 lens. I find it incredibly sharp with a pleasing perspective and good bokeh. Some reckon the f1.4 version to be a superior performer, and if cost isn't an option then perhaps this may be your best bet. I have used zooms but nearly always at the shorter end of the scale. For some reason which I am unable explain, I always find myself using telephoto's with colour film. Conversely, I nearly always use wide angles or standards with B&W. Strange huh? Regards, BLIGHTY.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blighty
    Nicole,
    For portraiture, I nearly always use a Nikon 85mm f1.8 lens. I find it incredibly sharp with a pleasing perspective and good bokeh. Some reckon the f1.4 version to be a superior performer, and if cost isn't an option then perhaps this may be your best bet. I have used zooms but nearly always at the shorter end of the scale. For some reason which I am unable explain, I always find myself using telephoto's with colour film. Conversely, I nearly always use wide angles or standards with B&W. Strange huh? Regards, BLIGHTY.
    Hi Blighty, well, I just ordered the Nikon 85mm 1.8.
    What's bokeh!
    Style is Style, you obviously have found what works for you.
    Cheers
    Nicole

  7. #37
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    AF becomes much less of an issue, Nicole, if the kid is properly super-glued to the floor, or velcroed to the wall. ;-)

    Although I happened on what may be an unusually sharp 28-200 "consumer grade" Nikkor zoom, the variable aperture can be a problem in the studio with flash. Not so with natural light, of course. But, you'll see a significant difference with the pro-level AFS zooms. I use both the 28-70 and the 80-200, and they're tack sharp. BUT, they are pricey, too.

    I also like the 105mm Micro Nikkor for 35mm portraits, but the 85mm gets rave reviews, as well.

    I've also used a 110mm (manual focus) Makro Planar on my Hassy with kids, but I had them set up with an "activity prop" so they didn't move around too much. With a little practice, follow-focus starts to become natural, and almost intuitive.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  8. #38
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    Hi Ralph, great to hear from you! Just can't afford the Hassy lenses yet, will have to make do with the 80mm planar for now.
    I better get out there now.
    Kind regards,
    Nicole

  9. #39
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    Nicole,
    Bokeh refers to the 'quality' of the out of focus regions, in front and behind the subject, in particular the out of focus highlights (some egghead's bound to disagree with me here!!). Regards BLIGHTY

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Just can't afford the Hassy lenses yet, will have to make do with the 80mm planar for now.
    Hi

    In Denmark a used 150 mm for Hassy costs $700-$800 (US$ that is). Is that still too expensive?

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