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  1. #1
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Lenses for Babies, Kids, Candids & Weddings

    I'd love to know what your favourites pro lenses are for pro portrait/candid shots of babies, children, adults, seniors, weddings

    Fixed?
    Zoom?
    Speed?
    Focus Length?
    What do you use it for?

    Kind regards,
    Nicole

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    I'd love to know what your favourites pro lenses are for pro portrait/candid shots of babies, children, adults, seniors, weddings

    Fixed?
    Zoom?
    Speed?
    Focus Length?
    What do you use it for?
    I use a 70-300 zoom lens with various filters (softener, polarizer, orange et.al.) for portraits (both inside with flash-heads and outdoors and a Canon EF 50 mm f/1.8 as well, but you need to get close to the face which can be intimidating. But I am saving up for a Canon EF 85 mm, f/1.8 (was suggested to me by Cheryl).

    For your Hasselblad, a Carl Zeiss 150 mm, is a GREAT choice for portraits.

    For all lenses for this purpose it's important that they are fast, as a wide aperture will help you to blur the background and keep the person pin sharp at the same time.

    See this thread for more info (I know it is 'bout Canon lenses, but the main idea could be of interest for you. Nikon must be having a similar lens):

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum52/7682-canon-eos-portrait-lens.html

  3. #3
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    When I am working in 35mm I use a 35mm-105mm and it seems to be the perfect set up for people, when working in 6cm x 6cm I use either a 135mm or a 150mm and that seem real good in this situation.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties

  4. #4
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Thanks Morten! I'm currently tossing up between the one of these:
    Nikon 85mm 1.8
    Nikon 85mm 2.8
    Sigma EX 105mm 2.8

    Has anyone used any of these?

  5. #5
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    When I am working in 35mm I use a 35mm-105mm and it seems to be the perfect set up for people, when working in 6cm x 6cm I use either a 135mm or a 150mm and that seem real good in this situation.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties
    Hi Dave, what's the pros/cons over zoom vs fixed in this regard? Apart from the obvious 'legs vs zoom' ?

  6. #6
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    I use a 70-300 zoom lens with various filters (softener, polarizer, orange et.al.) for portraits (both inside with flash-heads and outdoors.[/url]
    Morten, do you find the 70-300 not adequate?

  7. #7
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    I like working with a high quality zoom when working with 35mm due to the fact it allows me a little more flexability on where I stand in a working situtation and still allows me to capture those moments that would be ruined with a photographer in the subjects face, such as that quick kiss that always happens between the bride and groom at the reception, or the toddler sneaking up and pulling the cats tail or riding the dog, it has just worked out to be good for me in many different situations with out intruding into the moment. If you use a zoom make sure it is the highest quality you can afford, good quality zooms now a days can delivery great quality.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Morten, do you find the 70-300 not adequate?
    It is rather slow (4-5.6) and heavy. But it is pin sharp and versatile. As I want to shoot outdoors with an ISO 50 film I could use the speed of f/1.8. The background is also more out of focus with a faster lens.

    See my first post again as I have edited it.

  9. #9
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    I like working with a high quality zoom when working with 35mm due to the fact it allows me a little more flexability on where I stand in a working situtation and still allows me to capture those moments that would be ruined with a photographer in the subjects face, such as that quick kiss that always happens between the bride and groom at the reception, or the toddler sneaking up and pulling the cats tail or riding the dog, it has just worked out to be good for me in many different situations with out intruding into the moment. If you use a zoom make sure it is the highest quality you can afford, good quality zooms now a days can delivery great quality.
    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties
    Thanks Dave, budget's still a bit tight though. So have to look at my best options on a small budget for now.

  10. #10
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Nicole, what system are you shooting again?

    Dave

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