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  1. #51
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I would recommend one of the myriad Canon EOS film bodies with an EF lens lens that meets your requirements.

    With a fast 28mm or 24mm lens and one of the cheap 28mm-90mm kit lenses in your pocket as a supplement, you could cover almost everything, have the option of auto-focus and matrix and other metering choices and, at least with respect to the body and the kit lens, not have to worry much about the cost.

    If you would like two Rebel 2000 bodies, two BP200 grips and a 28mm-90mm kit lens for $150 plus shipping, just send me a pm .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by laroygreen View Post
    For me, it seems like the fastest way of working, and based on what I normally shoot, I've never really had any issues and its served me well. I don't claim to be an exposure guru, so any advice (please no flame wars!) would be nice, and ultimately, good exposures and good focus are my primary concern as we all know that film is rather expensive, especially if you have to import it yourself!
    If you have a good work routine set up, then go with it. No explanations required.

    With that said, here's my <rather uneducated> advice, based on how I work when out-and-about.

    1. Wide lenses allow hyperfocal focusing, which makes the focus errors pretty non-existent.
    2. Exposure...heh...I totally SUCK at guessing exposures. I'm getting better, but the smartest things that I've done are to 1) practice a lot, 2) preset my shutter with the light, not with the shots that may or may not show up, and 3) find a film/developer combination that gives me the look that I want and allows a little bit of latitude for my bad exposure guesses.

    Also, carry a small light meter. My budget doesn't allow for one, but I use the BeeCam light meter app on my phone, and it's actually pretty damn good (tested against the meters on my Pentax and Nikon).

  3. #53

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    MattKing - I would prefer a camera that didn't look "modern". I don't want anyone to have to guess if its a recent camera and if its valuable. One look at it should instantly tell them "piece of junk" (although it isn't). Thank you for the generous offer though.

    Sundowner - I'd rather not use an external light meter. No idea if it would slow me down or not, but I don't think I would be comfortable having to use one before I take a picture.

    Les Sarile - Rest assured, I aint no Steve McCurry ... best description for my photography is "Seldom competent, often times worse" (a quote from the BBC).

  4. #54

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    I have found among the cameras that I own. Let me use my Nikon F5 as a camera with a metering system similar to those in the DSLRs. The Nikon F3, Nikon FM, Pentax KX is as accurate as the F5 although they don't have matrix or spot. The Minolta XD-11 is a bit worse but not very much. The Olympus OM-2 is up to 2 stops off at certain light level. The Minolta SRT-101 is about the same as the OM-2. But there are only a few older cameras ( cameras that don't look like current DSLR's) that have spot meter like the Olympus OM-2s or OM-4. I think it's better to use a handheld spot meter.

  5. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by laroygreen View Post
    Les Sarile - Rest assured, I aint no Steve McCurry ... best description for my photography is "Seldom competent, often times worse" (a quote from the BBC).
    This is merely to point out that C41 film has so much latitude that you shouldn't worry about it. Also, that even with narrow latitude Kodachrome, you don't need much technology to properly expose it. After all, even the Argus brick was intended to use slide film.

  6. #56

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    I've been finding, general population often cannot tell SLR cameras apart - digital, analog, expensive, cheap, new, old, etc, etc, etc. If you think bringing a DLSR will make you a target, then I'd doubt you are that much safer bringing in older film SLR. They'd be studying you from afar anyway. They might see a 'professional looking' camera and see money. Absence of LCD on the back or the fact it is scratched up won't be noticeable until he gets it away from you. Having a cheap camera will less your monetary loss but not necessary lessen your bodily harm.

    People can; however, tell P&S cameras and recognize them as cheap stuff. How about getting some of those? Plus, please don't go alone. I don't know the area you are going into or the people who live there but if hair on back of your head is already standing up, that's sign enough. I'd be careful.
    Last edited by tkamiya; 01-01-2012 at 11:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by laroygreen View Post
    I'd rather not use an external light meter. No idea if it would slow me down or not, but I don't think I would be comfortable having to use one before I take a picture.
    Understandable. I use my phone sparingly as well. Learn to guess accurately, then.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by laroygreen View Post
    MattKing - I would prefer a camera that didn't look "modern". I don't want anyone to have to guess if its a recent camera and if its valuable. One look at it should instantly tell them "piece of junk" (although it isn't). Thank you for the generous offer though.
    Sundowner - I'd rather not use an external light meter. No idea if it would slow me down or not, but I don't think I would be comfortable having to use one before I take a picture.
    Les Sarile - Rest assured, I aint no Steve McCurry ... best description for my photography is "Seldom competent, often times worse" (a quote from the BBC).
    If you are in Trinidad or Jamaica, you are a very brave photographer indeed.
    I would second a few recommendations I've seen so far. K1000 or similar is sufficiently amateur looking that it is unthreatening, and Does Not look like it is worth stealing. Nikon AF35 is good, or AF600 if something wider is needed as a backup body. Both looking like vacation cameras and are capable of good images. I happen to really dislike the shutter feel of vertical travel metal shutters, preferring cloth horizontal ones instead. But shutters don't take pictures per se, and that is just a personal thing. I know in Bdos there is good photographic resources, which you might to look into. One last suggestion is any SLR with built-in flash, which always looks like a toy, so is probably not high on a steal list.
    Last edited by dhosten; 01-01-2012 at 11:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #59

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    I don't know if you have ever compared the latitude of film and digi since you say you used both, but here is a simple comparison that you can verify yourself. I don't know what digi you have, but I have also tested other brands and they all pretty much are very similar in range. Reference a "good exposure" and simply increase shutter time till the scene is clipped and you will see that the new Kodak Portra 400 goes on and on. And even then you can apply post to recover some of it still.



    Link to larger version -> Latitude comparison

  10. #60
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    The way you do your forward planning will be of more consequence than the camera you use, I would suggest. Some years ago I worked on a current affairs program at a radio station and had to do the occasional interview in known crime areas (nothing like some areas in the Carribean, but hairy enough). The reason I never had a problem I attribute largely to my producer who helped me plan each project. If I could pass on some of her advice to you I'd suggest you set out a summary of the project, a shooting schedule, the people/areas/scenarios you want to photograph etc., put it all on paper and make several copies. To get your shooting schedule you'll want to set it all up beforehand, rather than turning up unannounced with a camera. Spend a day or two in the area, buy something from the locals, even if it's just a coffee and sandwich, talk to people and if possible find out who controls the area and go and talk to them. Unless you're a crook yourself I've found crims are usually willing to be moderately accommodating if you explain clearly what you want (give them a copy of your plan) and talk about what's in it for them, ie a chance to tell their story to someone who has no bias. You're no threat to them and they have no reason to get heavy with you. If they give you their blessing, they'll pass the word around and you should be able to do your work unmolested, in which case it doesn't matter what camera you use. If they turn you down, well you have to decide whether to continue or not and no amount of playing around with cameras will be of any help to you. Of course, I say all this from the safety of my chair in relatively placid South Australia. You will know whether what I've said would work in your part of the world.

    Good for you, mate. These stories need to be documented and the disadvantaged need a voice. Best of luck.

    Les



 

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