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  1. #1

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    Hello from Atlanta, GA !

    Hello,
    I am new to this site, and new to film.
    I do not have a strong film background/experience.
    I recently purchased a 4x5 Sinar f2, as I am wanting to learn film and the LF style of shooting.

    I have been enjoying the use of my Canon 5dMkII, a lot!
    I also like to spend time working in Photoshop.

    Hoping for a great new experience with my "new to me" equipment.

  2. #2
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    .
    Welcome Home Buggz !

    Enjoy The Weekend !

    Ron
    .

  3. #3

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    Hello and a warm welcome to APUG. I hope you enjoy film photography.

    Jeff

  4. #4
    fotch's Avatar
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    Hello Buggz and welcome to APUG. I enjoy working in a photo shop much more the working with photoshop.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #5
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard neighbor, film, APUG AND large format! Now I see where you're located, that I didn't in your other post.

    I don't want to discourage you, far from it, but I will say that you've bitten off a pretty big chunk going straight to large format with little film experience. Most people learn film in smaller formats first. What you're doing is certainly possible, and maybe even easier and quicker in the long run, but fair warning, it IS going to be challenging at times. Even long time film shooters make comical errors starting into large format. I've made them all and discovered some new ones, I think.

    The large format home page is a great resource for large format info. Note that their forums (also excellent and highly recommended) are down this weekend for upgrades and the home page may be intermittent, but it's working now. If you can't get it just wait until the upgrade is done, then read, read, read:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/

    What drew you into large format to start with film? And, maybe a dumb question, but do you like working slowly and deliberately to get just what you want on film (or whatever medium?) Large format is in many ways the antithesis of the digital you're used to, with 35mm and medium format being in between. Where digital shooters are accustomed to being able to "spray and pray" and do their editing and culling of bad shots later, film cuts that ability down substantially and large format laughs at it. With 35mm you can still shoot a lot (though it gets more expensive if you do) and can shoot almost as quickly as digital, the difference mainly being having to stop to load another roll every 36 shots. With medium format you can shoot a bit slower but still pretty fast, but have to change film every 8-16 shots depending on format and camera. With large format - well, if I hurry, I can set up an initial shot and get an exposure made in 10 minutes. Some people can do it in less than half that time. I can expose more sheets of the same subject at different exposures and such more quickly of course. It's an entirely different mind set and way of working even than 35mm or medium format film.

    Just a suggestion but - you could get an all manual 35mm camera of good quality and 1-3 lenses for probably less than $100, use it (ideally) with a separate hand held meter as that's what you'll be doing in large format, and learn film and exposure much less expensively and with far less frustration than starting with large format, then sell it off for what you paid.

    Large format is fun, the quality is superb, and you can do things with the plane of focus not easily done any other way. It is not really difficult but the gear does NOTHING for you. You do everything and it does only what you tell it. From metering the scene to thinking about how you want it to look to manipulating the focus plane to keeping your film holders organized, it's all up to you.

    Can we assume from your enjoyment of Photoshop that you will be scanning your film and working in what we call hybrid workflow? They don't like us discussing that in detail here but presumably it's ok to ask. It's different form darkroom work. (You can talk about hybrid workflow with large format all you like over on the large format forum.)

  6. #6
    papagene's Avatar
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    buggz - hello and welcome to APUG from western Massachusetts. LF is quite a big first step into film photography, but is quite doable. I think you will be very impressed with your LF inages over the d*g* stuff. Have fun!
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  7. #7
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG.
    Charles Hohenstein

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It is certainly do-able. I don't mean to discourage anyone. But it is learning, essentially, two new subjects at once, film photography and the use of a large format camera.

    You might pick up a copy of Using the View Camera:

    http://www.amazon.com/Using-View-Cam...9518865&sr=8-1

    Also, Ansel Adam's The Camera, not strictly limited to view cameras but with good view camera info and generic "shooting with film cameras" info:

    http://www.amazon.com/Camera-Ansel-A...9518982&sr=1-1

    His other two books in the series are more specific to black and white darkroom.

  9. #9
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Riverdale, GA
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    Thanks for all the replies!

    > Roger > What drew you into large format to start with film?
    - hmm, "something more" than the files I get from my 5DMkII?
    Don't get me wrong, I *LOVE* my 5DMkII, but,
    I have been pondering digital medium format for a couple of years now.
    I have concluded, that for ENORMOUS amounts of monies, which I will NEVER be able to afford,
    I would gain very little.
    I have lately been using pano stitching very successfully building huge resolution files w/ my 5DMkII, so I am
    somewhat uncertain if my foray into LF film is wise.
    Another questionable item about my choice at this time to go to LF film, is the ever decreasing film choices/resources.
    Shrug, it's something I have kind of been wanting to do.
    I am an electronics engineer by training, and get bored very easily if I don't learn something new and
    challenging.
    Thus my current hobby of photography for the last 4 or so years has been enjoyable for me.
    I find that photography is VAST, from hard core technical, to exotic art. I like it all.
    I calibrate my monitors and printer, and dabble with Corel Painter 12.
    I read all I can, and never get enough.
    I actually shot 35mm film in the later 70's, early 80's during part of my US Navy training.
    I found that 35mm slide film was more affordable, and actually liked it.
    I, now regret, got away from all that, ever exploring many different hobbies, and far too many at one time.
    Oh, and I still have that equipment, Konica T4 body, lenses, etc.
    Heh, my old Vivtar 285 STILL works! I use it w/ remote triggers on my 5DMkII, along w/ my 580EXII flash.
    I even bought an old Canon EOS film body w/ winder a couple of years ago.
    I was teaching my niece about film, even using her Pokemon camera, it was fun.
    I LOVE teaching.
    Though, I somehow concluded, maybe unwisely?, after a few months of using 35m film, that it wasn't worth
    scanning 35mm slides.
    Though, the Pokemon camera had the artsy side to it, it was cool.
    And I DO like working slowly.
    I have been enjoying the use, about a year now, of old manual focus lens of many types, of many different brands
    with my 5DMkII via adapters. I have many now, forever buying more.
    I seem to have an addiction, so I guess LF camera style shooting is another step in my photography "hobby".
    Yes, I intend to scan my 4x5 film to process via PS and print from my inkjet.
    Though, I have been intrigued by this really great read:
    <<http://theagnosticprint.org/future-of-scanning/>>
    There is a great thread on LF forums of people hacking stuff, I LOVE this.
    And just in from Amazon today:
    - Using The View Camera - Steve Simmons
    - View Camera Technique, 7th edition - Leslie Stroebel
    So, there you have it, me, well, kinda some of it, and waaay too long winded, and I'm sure boring to everyone.
    But I'm kind of excited, again!

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