Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,828   Posts: 1,582,146   Online: 1086
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,253

    What happened to 400-speed film?

    I've followed this forum for a number of years, but only joined last spring. I've finally decided to start posting.
    Basically, I'm more of a snap-shooter. I doubt I'd qualify as an hobbyist, let alone amateur.

    To me, photos are my memories, and I prefer film. I've taken pictures since I was a child, and my limited processing/dark-room experience started with a "mini-course" in the 8th grade. My senior year at the University of Toledo I took a photo-journalism class, and since the professor was more photographer than journalist, we fortunately spent a lot of time in the dark room.

    Since then I've done periodic black-and-white processing at home, but have recently been gearing up for full-blown color and B&W processing and printing.


    The thread title is more of a rhetorical question as an excuse for an introduction. Improvements in chemistry and production methods are obviously what happened, not unexpectedly. However, recently I had a pleasant surprise.

    I'd been using 110 until, many years ago, a college skiing accident destroyed my camera. It fell out of my pocket and was combed into the slope. It was succeeded by a cheap manual point-and-shoot 35mm.

    When I had the 110, I used what film I could find, but upon entering the 35mm world I stuck to 100-speed consumer films. (As of 2009 I started using professional films as well, and like them both, but money can be an issue at times.)
    I rarely used any type of 400-speed film; only when desperate. At our local department/drug stores, it has become difficult to find 100-speed, so lately I've settled for 200. My source for the "good stuff" (pro film) is online, as I am boycotting our Cleveland area pro-shop chain.

    Anyway; last fall I won a near-mint Realist 45 on ebay. Patience is not one of my virtues - I just _had_ to test the camera the day after it arrived. It was a positively dreary day, so I bought a pack of Fuji 400-speed consumer film and shot some boring 3d pictures during my lunch hour. I was very surprised with the "fine" grain and sharpness relative to the last time I used 400-speed 35mm film, which was a _very_ long time ago.

    So, when did this happen, and how (in general terms) does the modern 400-speed compare to 100-speed of, say, the past two decades?

    Oh, one more question...
    Is magenta a color?
    Last edited by Truzi; 01-13-2013 at 03:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ogden, Utah USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,321
    magenta is this weird chick in "Rocky Horror Picture Show."

  3. #3
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,041
    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    Is magenta a color?
    One could get philosphical about that... But as this is a colour impression our brain gives us, it is a colour to me.

    You might refer to it as a "colour that isn't"...

  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    Is magenta a color?
    Welcome to APUG!

    Where were you skiing when you 11-camera became one with the Universe?

    The two letter troll got booted out of APUG1 while he was declaring that magenta was not a color in the dreaded Kodachrome has been deleted thread. That was not because of his option, rather it was because he was a really nasty piece of work.


    1He was also booted out of hasselblad.info for the same reason.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,253
    I'd ask which weird chick if I'd not memorized Rocky Horror. Great memories of weekend nites blowing off steam at the theatre.

    The thread with the magenta argument was quite interesting (I also remember someone jokingly ask if fog was a color). I've a twisted sense of humor, sorry.

    My 110 is one with the attic at the moment. It had been a Christmas gift from my grandparents when I was a child, so I retrieved it and packed it away. It could probably work again if I tried - the door had come off and there was some broken plastic, but it wasn't reduced to pieces.

    The college ski trip was to Crystal Mountain in Michigan. Crystal Mountain is better than Brandywine here in Ohio. Someday, however, I hope to ski a "real" mountain.

    The camera had come out of my unzipped pocket during a fall, and I'd not noticed 'till I wanted to use it when on another slope. Figuring where it was, I could actually see it as a black spot when we were on the ski lift to retrieve it. The cartridge was unscathed. Had I been a 15 minutes earlier I'd likely not have moved to 35mm until 110 was difficult to source.
    Truzi

  6. #6
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,224
    Hello Truzi and welcome to APUG.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    337
    Take Kodak ASA 400 Tri-x and their ASA 400 Tmax B&W films, completely different grains. Same goes for Ilford, since they have more types of film you can even take the fine grain Delta 400 and the not much (if even) finer grained ASA 125 FP4. This doesn't make one film better than the other, I for instance prefer the general look of the bigger grained FP4.

    Grain size wise the Kodak T-grain probably was the biggest revolution in grain size during the last few decades, you can still debate if it produces the best films, many different views on that here on APUG

    To some extend the developer influences the grain as well.

  8. #8
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    Someday, however, I hope to ski a "real" mountain.
    My skiing experience is limited to three ski areas east of the Mississippi River and only a total of 39 resorts in North America, but basically if the skiing is in the Rocky Mountains or further west, you can't go too far wrong. Lowest prices: Salt Lake City area.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #9
    papagene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Western Mass., USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,199
    Images
    118
    Hello and welcome to APUG!
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  10. #10
    hgernhardt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Brockton, MA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    68

    I'm not complaining…

    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    I was very surprised with the "fine" grain and sharpness relative to the last time I used 400-speed 35mm film, which was a _very_ long time ago.
    Back in '07, I shot some Fuji Neopan 400. Beautiful film. Of course, the last time I'd used Tri-X was when I was shooting 35mm, and even then I had started moving over to TMax. The only thing I can figure is that manufacturing and chemistry techniques have evolved in a manner similar to that of computer technology. Smaller, faster, better.

    I'm looking forward to what comes out of the roll of Ilford 3200 I picked up yesterday. I'm thinking of using it in my Box Tengor at night. Should be fun.

    Welcome!
    Henry C. Gernhardt, III

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin