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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by spankurmonkey View Post
    Thanks for the info and I need to read the manual but who can give me cliff notes on how to adjust the camera with respect to the timing/fstop ,etc? I think it is the two dials on the front.

    Also, does it also shoot color?

    what size photos does it produce?

    I've not thought about development myself but I really want to try this out. My father had one a longtime ago and I know before he passed he bought this one on Ebay. However, I don't think he ever got the opportunity to shoot any film through it. So I want to take some myself to keep his passion going.

    Thanks!!
    http://www.butkus.org/chinon/yashica...shicamat_m.htm

    for manual if that is the model you have there are several

    We need to know which part of the planet you are on...

    If you buy a changing bag and development tank you can process your own monochrome or colour negative easily.

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/aboutus/page.asp?n=31

    oh and welcome

  2. #12

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    I am from the US. Live in Minnesota.

    I really appreciate the responses. This may be a really dumb question but developing the film is only one step right? How do you get the actual prints? Any YT videos out there that can show me the process?

  3. #13
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    The sunny 16 rule is for a subject in bright open sun, set the shutter at 1 over the film speed and aperture at f/16. Example: shooting 100 speed film, you set shutter at 1/100 at f-16. For weak hazy sun, open up one stop(f-11) for cloudy bright, one more stop (f-8), or slow the shutter by one step(1/50 @ f-11)this would be the same setting needed for a subject in open shade (no sun falling on subject but bright sun elsewhere). My suggestion, buy a cheap light meter (incident) and learn to use it. IMO, there is no better way to learn proper exposure than with the camera you have plus a decent incident meter.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  4. #14

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    Here's a guide to developing the (black and white) film: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applications/page.asp?n=9
    -- and here: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf

    Chemicals are cheap and available mail order from Freestyle and others, tanks are available in the classifieds or on ebay for around $20-30. Nikor is my preferred brand, but make sure you get the 120 size!
    Scan the negative or print it with an enlarger (maybe your local art museum or community college has a darkroom)

    Here's a post that explains exposure and how to estimate how to set the camera for different situations:
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm
    You don't *really* need a light meter, you can do pretty well without.
    Last edited by Peter Simpson; 04-23-2014 at 12:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

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    If you have a smartphone, there are a number of exposure meter apps (some free) out there you can get, and they work really well, I find. I am only aware of light meter apps that are "reflective" (i.e. they measure the light reflecting off the subject and coming to the film), which is the way exposure meters built into cameras work. An "incident" meter, which actually measures the light hitting the subject, is more accurate (since it's not fooled by excessively bright or dark subjects), but more complicated to use.

    Someone has already directed you to the butkus camera instruction manuals site, so hopefully you can find the right one for your particular camera there. But the Yashica Mats all work more or less the same way; some have light meters, or the capacity to accept 220 film (takes 24 exposures; very hard to find these days). Basically, you load the unexposed film in the compartment at the bottom of the camera, making sure the printed side of the film backing paper is facing outward (i.e. against the back of the camera. Insert the tip of the film paper into the slot in the empty spool that's sitting in the top compartment (I hope the camera came with an empty spool; can't do anything without one!). Then, wind the crank clockwise so the film is being wound onto the top spool, until the large arrow on the back of the film paper (looks like <-------->) lines up with the two small red dots you see on either side of the film, just below the square opening where the film is exposed. Once you've line up the arrow with those dots (what are often called the "start marks"), close and lock the back, and then continue to wind the crank until it stops -- the frame counter on the camera should now be at frame #1. To cock the shutter, turn the crank counterclockwise until it stops. Set the shutter speed and aperture, and push the shutter release! You can then wind on to the next frame.

    Here is a link to a very comprehensive site on the Yashica TLR models, like your Yashica Mat: http://www.yashicatlr.com/index.html
    Last edited by Nick Merritt; 04-23-2014 at 01:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    DWO
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    it shoots color if you put in color film

  7. #17
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spankurmonkey View Post
    I am from the US. Live in Minnesota.

    I really appreciate the responses. This may be a really dumb question but developing the film is only one step right? How do you get the actual prints? Any YT videos out there that can show me the process?
    Developing exposed film is a multi-step process, that must be completed in total darkness. There are daylight processing tanks, but they must be loaded in total darkness. Once loaded and closed, the rest can be done in open light. Once the film is developed and dry, it can then be printed or scanned(please pardon that word).

    Send me your mailing address and I will send you a roll of black and white film. Once you have finished shooting it, return it to me for processing and printing--free to you.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  8. #18

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    Hi Rick

    Yea normally you use a negative film develope it and either scan it for a positive image or contact print it for square 6x6 cm positive print or enlarge it for a bigger positive print.

    You can use a transparency film and develop it for projection like a power point slide in a projector rather than a computer.

    You need to go to library and borrow books and read threads and ask questions...

    Lots to learn.

    Noel

  9. #19
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Hi Rick


    Lots to learn.

    Noel
    There's an under statement
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  10. #20
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWO View Post
    it shoots color if you put in color film
    And if you bring it to England, you can shoot colour with it!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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