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  1. #21
    Trask's Avatar
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    Nice that you've chosen to join us here on APUG. I've got an SQ-A and find it a great camera -- the Speed Grip is very useful both for quickly advancing the film and, frankly, holding the camera steady. I suggest you try one while shopping.

  2. #22
    TBL
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    I'm new here also. I've recently retired from teaching physics and for the first time in decades have some time to devote to photography. I've been using an old Ricohmatic 225 tlr that belonged to my grandfather and have acquired a number of old 35mm cameras including a Nikon F and several seventies era Pentax SLRs. I've also been developing c-41 process color film using a changing bag, Patterson tank, and a temperature controlled water bath built in an old cooler. So far I've just been scanning the negatives with an Epson scanner, but there is an old Sears enlarger in my dad's attic that I may try to resurrect. I'll never be a great artist with a camera, but I sure am having fun.

  3. #23
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    Hello, it's a nice journey of discovery isn't it?

    For your use (slow landscape photos) i would say that you were correct in thinking Mamiya 67.

    They are awesome cameras (and lenses) at excellent value.

    What you should be aware of is all the extra time and work you will be spending to produce just one good picture. That's ok if you have the time, but it can become an issue if you have a lot of other commitments.

    As film is my main medium now, I am amazed by the speed of the digital workflow whenever I use a DSLR.

    An image from a scanned negative is also much less malleable in Lightroom than a digital original. You can do some basic work but if you do too much you will blow the grain, tonality etc. So there will be more emphasis on getting it right first, i.e. choice of film, exposure and development.

    Last, you should consider using slide film for landscape work. It scans easier, you have more latitude in Lightroom and you can convert it to B&W.
    Last edited by Jaf-Photo; 07-09-2014 at 12:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    Welcome to A.P.U.G., what's a histogram ?
    I think that it is a medical procedure for people to do chimpin'.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    What you should be aware of is all the extra time and work you will be spending to produce just one good picture. That's ok if you have the time, but it can become an issue if you have a lot of other commitments.

    As film is my main medium now, I am amazed by the speed of the digital workflow whenever I use a DSLR.

    An image from a scanned negative is also much less malleable in Lightroom than a digital original. You can do some basic work but if you do too much you will blow the grain, tonality etc. So there will be more emphasis on getting it right first, i.e. choice of film, exposure and development.

    Last, you should consider using slide film for landscape work. It scans easier, you have more latitude in Lightroom and you can convert it to B&W.
    :-) Hi JAf
    I would say anything I would ever need doing fast would still be done digital. I've spent literally hours just working on a single image in Lightroom but I feel the boffins at Adobe have done the hard work sometimes. I really want to take it to the next level and start working in-camera more while I'm there with the landscape is in front of me. Here's just a couple I've done over the years that I'm really happy with. I think Film will suit my style.:Flickr
    manipulating tonality in light room can still cause all sorts of contrast issues even with digital. The more you try to correct an image that wasn't taken as perfectly as possible the more assumptions the software has to make the more evidence creeps into the image.
    I would like to progress to hand making print's eventually. Scanning is the stop-gap.

  6. #26
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    That's indeed very nice editing. I can see how Tri-X would be your film.

    (This is of course forbidden conversation, but I think you should try the Nik suite plugins, if you haven't alteady. They really boosts Lightroom, making it a faster and more powerful tool.)

    Anyway, best of luck and keep us posted!

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