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  1. #11
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxpete View Post
    Blimey !! ( 'London-Speak' for Goodness Gracious ) -- you are very lucky to start with such gear -- I started in 1951 with my Mum's Kodak Hawkeye Box Camera which she got by saving up 'Black Cat' Cigarette coupons in the 1930's ( as she didn't smoke it took a LONG TIME!)
    Over here in UK FILM was a rareity after the war as all production went to the Armed Forces -- it was only ten years later that we could get film and one roll cost a week's pocket money for me !! I used to cycle round all the Chemists shops asking if they had any 'Outdated film cheap for a poor Schoolboy' and got a lot of Kodak Verichrome and Ilford FP3 and Selochrome for 6 pence a roll 120 size!
    Reminds me of that Monty Python piece about living in a shoe box on the motorway

  2. #12
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    If your anything like me you'll soon find that the Mamiya is your favorite, get yourself a good hand held light meter (if you don't already have one) and tripod, and you'll be set. I've only been shooting film for a little over a year and developing my own B&W the whole time and I've tried about 20 different cameras, the Mamiya is the only one thats kept me interested the whole time. I had a Nikon F2 for awhile but got away from 35mm to stick with medium format, and I actually just sold my 6x9 Ikonta to a friend yesterday. Got myself down to just the RB67 so I cn concentrate on that, theres just so much you can do with it, and it has amazing macro capabilities especially with extension tubes or the 50mm lens.
    Nikon F, Nikkor-S 35mm F=2.8
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle M. View Post
    I actually just sold my 6x9 Ikonta to a friend yesterday.
    Even I would just stick to my Hasselblad 501cm. But I keep shooting 35mm on my Canon 1V because for street shots and likes, I need autofocus.

    Except Zeiss, and a Canon macro, I do not think any of the common lenses were manufactured keeping manual focus in mind (long throw et all).
    This message has no signature. :)

  4. #14
    jcc
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    Also, I just noticed your location, have you checked out the Treehouse over on Ward (if you're on Oahu)?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    Well, you have to be rich to get credit these days


    The Mamiya is s great camera. My suggestion would be to start with that and see if you enjoy the whole analog process.


    If the bug bites you, then you should look for an analog EOS body that is compatible with your, no doubt impressive, array of L-lenses.


    Cheers!

    True, luckily I think I built up most of my credit before my photography addiction .


    I think I'm looking forward to the Mamiya the most because of the polaroid back and the bigger negatives with medium format. I'm also hearing good things about bokeh/shallow DOF compared to 35mm.


    I don't know about an impressive array, but that would be cool if I could use some of those with film.


    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxpete View Post
    Blimey !! ( 'London-Speak' for Goodness Gracious ) -- you are very lucky to start with such gear -- I started in 1951 with my Mum's Kodak Hawkeye Box Camera which she got by saving up 'Black Cat' Cigarette coupons in the 1930's ( as she didn't smoke it took a LONG TIME!)
    Over here in UK FILM was a rareity after the war as all production went to the Armed Forces -- it was only ten years later that we could get film and one roll cost a week's pocket money for me !! I used to cycle round all the Chemists shops asking if they had any 'Outdated film cheap for a poor Schoolboy' and got a lot of Kodak Verichrome and Ilford FP3 and Selochrome for 6 pence a roll 120 size!

    Yeah, I had a lot of stuff fall into my lap. I also have a couple of Olympus XA's to mess around with too. Have to check if those are functioning properly. If it was as big of a struggle for me to get supplies as you had, I would never have gotten started.


    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Down load the user manual - Free
    http://www.butkus.org/chinon/mamiya/...rb67_pro_s.htm


    buy some cheap film
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/aboutus/page.asp?n=31


    Do an art course

    Thanks for the links. Will take a look through the manual. I'm more of a visual learner so youtube stuff has been great too, and there's so much info that I've been sifting through online. All part of the experience, though. At least there's tons more resources available than when I first got into photography.


    I've picked a bunch of rolls of both 35mm and 120 in addition to the instant stuff. I've got a range of brands and ISO's--some Ektar, Ilford, Superia and Portra. Want to pick up some Velvia to mess around with too. Hopefully I can figure out which ones I like best.


    Art course isn't really possible with my schedule right now, but I definitely want to do some in the future.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle M. View Post
    If your anything like me you'll soon find that the Mamiya is your favorite, get yourself a good hand held light meter (if you don't already have one) and tripod, and you'll be set. I've only been shooting film for a little over a year and developing my own B&W the whole time and I've tried about 20 different cameras, the Mamiya is the only one thats kept me interested the whole time. I had a Nikon F2 for awhile but got away from 35mm to stick with medium format, and I actually just sold my 6x9 Ikonta to a friend yesterday. Got myself down to just the RB67 so I cn concentrate on that, theres just so much you can do with it, and it has amazing macro capabilities especially with extension tubes or the 50mm lens.

    Thanks, I hope that the Mamiya is more or less functioning because it's so heavy, that it's gonna cost a fortune just to ship it out. I would definitely like to get it cleaned up at some point, though. I'm open to any pointers on using the Mamiya (or anything, really). Do you use yours for landscape or portraits or both? I'm looking forward to trying it for portraits, but at some point want to explore landscapes with it, although the Ikonta is what I got for landscapes since it's a bit more portable. Was there something you didn't like about the Ikonta?


    Luckily I have a Sekonic L-358 that is way more light meter than I need anyway (got it for my studio stuff), so I'll be using that, plus in a pinch people have been telling me the light meter apps are decent too.


    I upgraded my tripod to an RRS last year, but the Mamiya weighs a ton so I'll have to see how well my ballhead handles. I need to pick up a plate for it before I can try it, though.


    Quote Originally Posted by shutterboy View Post
    Even I would just stick to my Hasselblad 501cm. But I keep shooting 35mm on my Canon 1V because for street shots and likes, I need autofocus.

    I have a feeling I will struggle a lot with manual focus too (since I suck with it in digital), so I suspect something with autofocus is in my future as well.


    Quote Originally Posted by jcc View Post
    Also, I just noticed your location, have you checked out the Treehouse over on Ward (if you're on Oahu)?

    Yep, I actually bought that Superheadz plastic camera from them a couple of months after they first opened. I'm kinda far from them and parking is a pain so I don't get there as much as I'd like, but since I bought that camera, they really got a lot of stock in. At that time they were only plastic cameras--Dianas, Holgas, etc., but now they have a pretty nice collection of higher end stuff. Plus they took over supplying the university courses with film once Imageworks closed and they've also been doing some swap meets, but I keep missing them because of other obligations. Good people there.


    Thanks for the welcomes, comments and suggestions, everyone.

  6. #16

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    This is the Mamiya bundle that I inherited from my uncle (polaroid back that I bought later not pictured)



    Don't know what everything is but bascially got the RB67 body with both 120mm and 220mm backs, the P adapter, magnifying hood, extra grid focusing screen, 45mm extension tube, shutter release cable, hard and soft cases and three lenses. Lenses are 50mm f4.5, 90mm f3.8 and 250mm f4.5. The 50mm looks like it's got some fungus or something--at least the front element is pretty foggy.

    This is what it looks like inside:


  7. #17
    Kyle M.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZENGHOST View Post
    True, luckily I think I built up most of my credit before my photography addiction .


    I think I'm looking forward to the Mamiya the most because of the polaroid back and the bigger negatives with medium format. I'm also hearing good things about bokeh/shallow DOF compared to 35mm.


    I don't know about an impressive array, but that would be cool if I could use some of those with film.





    Yeah, I had a lot of stuff fall into my lap. I also have a couple of Olympus XA's to mess around with too. Have to check if those are functioning properly. If it was as big of a struggle for me to get supplies as you had, I would never have gotten started.





    Thanks for the links. Will take a look through the manual. I'm more of a visual learner so youtube stuff has been great too, and there's so much info that I've been sifting through online. All part of the experience, though. At least there's tons more resources available than when I first got into photography.


    I've picked a bunch of rolls of both 35mm and 120 in addition to the instant stuff. I've got a range of brands and ISO's--some Ektar, Ilford, Superia and Portra. Want to pick up some Velvia to mess around with too. Hopefully I can figure out which ones I like best.


    Art course isn't really possible with my schedule right now, but I definitely want to do some in the future.





    Thanks, I hope that the Mamiya is more or less functioning because it's so heavy, that it's gonna cost a fortune just to ship it out. I would definitely like to get it cleaned up at some point, though. I'm open to any pointers on using the Mamiya (or anything, really). Do you use yours for landscape or portraits or both? I'm looking forward to trying it for portraits, but at some point want to explore landscapes with it, although the Ikonta is what I got for landscapes since it's a bit more portable. Was there something you didn't like about the Ikonta?


    Luckily I have a Sekonic L-358 that is way more light meter than I need anyway (got it for my studio stuff), so I'll be using that, plus in a pinch people have been telling me the light meter apps are decent too.


    I upgraded my tripod to an RRS last year, but the Mamiya weighs a ton so I'll have to see how well my ballhead handles. I need to pick up a plate for it before I can try it, though.





    I have a feeling I will struggle a lot with manual focus too (since I suck with it in digital), so I suspect something with autofocus is in my future as well.





    Yep, I actually bought that Superheadz plastic camera from them a couple of months after they first opened. I'm kinda far from them and parking is a pain so I don't get there as much as I'd like, but since I bought that camera, they really got a lot of stock in. At that time they were only plastic cameras--Dianas, Holgas, etc., but now they have a pretty nice collection of higher end stuff. Plus they took over supplying the university courses with film once Imageworks closed and they've also been doing some swap meets, but I keep missing them because of other obligations. Good people there.


    Thanks for the welcomes, comments and suggestions, everyone.
    I use my Mamiya for pretty much everything, I've carried it here, there, and everywhere, even on a couple of 2-3 mile hikes. I don't mind hand holding it and it rarely is on a tripod, everyone is different as far as steadiness goes I can hand hold it just fine down to 1/30 of a sec. with the 90mm lens. As far as pointers go I find focusing to be pretty easy I have a split image screen in mine but just recently got it, had a matte screen before. I only own the waist-level finder and always use the magnifier. If you have the original RB67 Professional and not the later Pro-S or Pro-SD theres no interlocks on the film back. IE. you can accidentally double expose, or pull the darkslide out of the back when it's off the camera and ruin your film. I also believe you have to flick the little lever below the advance knob before you can go to the next frame. Thats all I can think of right now but if you have any other questions on the RB let me know and I'll do my best to answer them. As far as the Ikonta goes it took amazing photos, was light and compact, and easy to use. But I've been trying to get back into a one camera groove and concentrate on the craft not the gear so I let it go to a friend who's been wanting it since she first saw it. That and I didn't care for having to guess my subject distance to focus, I did just fine with it but the constant fear of fudging up a good shot turned me off on it.
    Nikon F, Nikkor-S 35mm F=2.8
    Gossen Luna Pro F

  8. #18
    Kyle M.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZENGHOST View Post
    This is the Mamiya bundle that I inherited from my uncle (polaroid back that I bought later not pictured)



    Don't know what everything is but bascially got the RB67 body with both 120mm and 220mm backs, the P adapter, magnifying hood, extra grid focusing screen, 45mm extension tube, shutter release cable, hard and soft cases and three lenses. Lenses are 50mm f4.5, 90mm f3.8 and 250mm f4.5. The 50mm looks like it's got some fungus or something--at least the front element is pretty foggy.

    This is what it looks like inside:

    Supposing everything is in working order thats everything you should ever need. Thats a shame about the 50mm if it has fungus it's a great wide angle, though the 90mm is slightly wide as well. I've almost bought a 50mm several times but I've never needed anything wider than the 90mm so I've just held back, that and I'm afraid it might be too wide for most things. The 250mm is a great portrait lens, though possibly slightly long if your looking for full body portraits. One thing I forgot to mention make sure both the body and lens are cocked before attaching or detaching the lens. lenses should be stored with the shutter uncocked to keep tension off the shutter springs. When the two prongs on the back of the lens are lined up with the green and red dots the shutter is cocked, to fire the shutter push in the small silver button on the back of the lens and rotate the 2 prongs clockwise, to cock the shutter simply rotate them the other way until you hear a click.
    Nikon F, Nikkor-S 35mm F=2.8
    Gossen Luna Pro F

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle M. View Post
    I use my Mamiya for pretty much everything, I've carried it here, there, and everywhere, even on a couple of 2-3 mile hikes. I don't mind hand holding it and it rarely is on a tripod, everyone is different as far as steadiness goes I can hand hold it just fine down to 1/30 of a sec. with the 90mm lens. As far as pointers go I find focusing to be pretty easy I have a split image screen in mine but just recently got it, had a matte screen before. I only own the waist-level finder and always use the magnifier. If you have the original RB67 Professional and not the later Pro-S or Pro-SD theres no interlocks on the film back. IE. you can accidentally double expose, or pull the darkslide out of the back when it's off the camera and ruin your film. I also believe you have to flick the little lever below the advance knob before you can go to the next frame. Thats all I can think of right now but if you have any other questions on the RB let me know and I'll do my best to answer them. As far as the Ikonta goes it took amazing photos, was light and compact, and easy to use. But I've been trying to get back into a one camera groove and concentrate on the craft not the gear so I let it go to a friend who's been wanting it since she first saw it. That and I didn't care for having to guess my subject distance to focus, I did just fine with it but the constant fear of fudging up a good shot turned me off on it.
    I definitely have trouble hand-holding it. Focusing while hand-holding is a pain for me, give you props on that one. I also have enough trouble lugging my DSLR and lenses around as it is. I figure the Ikonta should be small enough to add to my regular pack without too much issue so I can throw in some landscapes on film while I'm shooting the digital stuff too. The one I got is coming from certo6 so it should work pretty well.

    I've read about the double-exposure thing and I can guarantee that I will do it accidentally at least a couple of times. Not sure about the lever below the advance knob, will have to check that when I get home. Was thinking about picking up some extra backs later--do you think it would it be worth the extra cost to pick up Pro-S or Pro-SD backs as opposed to the Pro back I have?

    So far I've figured out the general workings as far as shutter, dark slide, focusing, film loading, disassembly, etc., my next step is figuring out how to set aperture and shutter speed. I'm probably overcomplicating it, but it didn't seem as intuitive as I was hoping. I hope to test it out this weekend.

    Thanks for the help.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle M. View Post
    Supposing everything is in working order thats everything you should ever need. Thats a shame about the 50mm if it has fungus it's a great wide angle, though the 90mm is slightly wide as well. I've almost bought a 50mm several times but I've never needed anything wider than the 90mm so I've just held back, that and I'm afraid it might be too wide for most things. The 250mm is a great portrait lens, though possibly slightly long if your looking for full body portraits. One thing I forgot to mention make sure both the body and lens are cocked before attaching or detaching the lens. lenses should be stored with the shutter uncocked to keep tension off the shutter springs. When the two prongs on the back of the lens are lined up with the green and red dots the shutter is cocked, to fire the shutter push in the small silver button on the back of the lens and rotate the 2 prongs clockwise, to cock the shutter simply rotate them the other way until you hear a click.
    That's good info for the shutter, I'll have to check when I get home to make sure I did't leave the shutter cocked. I have no idea if I was leaving them cocked when attaching/detaching. I'd better be careful with that too.

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