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  1. #41
    Jorge Oliveira's Avatar
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    Jim

    If I remember correctly, this was the Hollerith machine. From it's evolution through history, a small company was born - IBM.

    If someone is interested, we may start an off topic thread re computer history - I have some nice ones heard from some real old timers (they were old whwn i was just starting).

    Jorge O

  2. #42
    Aggie's Avatar
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  3. #43
    Jorge Oliveira's Avatar
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    And let's not forget Charles Babbage's Difference and Analytical Engines and Ada Lovelace, Countess of Lovelace, the mathematical brain behind it.

    Jorge O

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim68134
    If I remember correctly, the PBS series "Connections" (the original and one of the best series ever produced for TV IMHO) argued that the first computer was used in the selection of what thread to weave at one point on looms to make sophisticated patterns in the late 1800s. Also around 1900 a punch card system was used to keep track, catalogue or "compute"statistics on immigrants coming into Ellis Island station.
    I remember that TV series well. It did stretch those connections a bit. Not to start a war or anything, but to be absolutely accurate, the weaving apparatus was programmable with a form of punch card but it did not "compute" anything. That was done by the "programmer" - puncher of the cards. One might infer that it was digitally controlled, and it was binary in nature. There were however ancient (well, very old) computers in use far earlier than the electronic revolution types. The fire control computers used to target torpedoes in WWII were definitely computers and definitely not digital.

  5. #45

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    To go back up several messages ...

    One of the drivers for Moore's law (possibly the main driver) does not apply for digital sensors. Much of the performance gain (and price drop) comes from continually shrinking the size of the chips. Shrinking chips for digital capture is not a good idea, as this inevitably increases noise levels (as does increasing the number of pixels for unit area). As a result I don't expect to see the same rate of improvement capability and price in digital equipment as has become normal in other areas of consumer electronics.

  6. #46

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    Welcome. I'm a fairly new member myself. You should try and use your mother's darkroom when she gets it setup. You might become addicted to conventional photography, at least for black & white. It's magic, but the magic in digital photography is short-lived. Someone mentioned the demise of 8-track audio tape as an analogy. That's one example, I guess, but there are some even within computers. 30 years ago, I took B&W pictures of my sister's wedding, and made some 8 x 10 glossies myself, by hand. Now, 30 years later, those prints still look like I just made them. However, on the computer side, I've owned a computer since my first one in 1979. I still have stuff on Apple disquettes that I can never use, files that will never again be opened. It's virtually impossible to even find an Apple II that can use them today. Mine bit the dust almost a decade ago. And that's not evening thinking about the stuff I had on the audio cassettes my Radio Shack TRS-80 Model III used. Yes, I could have found a way to transfer them via modem when I switched years ago, but the point is, who had time for that. Even now, I'm having a problem backing up just the pictures I scanned with my film scanner. Those suckers eat up a lot disk space, and it takes concerted willpower to get it done. But I have a shoebox that contains virtually every photo I took since 1980, and some from 1975 when I bought my first 35mm camera. Barring a catastrophe that would also destroy CD's, etc., the negatives will outlive me, I'm sure, and will be printable even if they fade a bit. Once you commit to the digital gods, they have you by the you-know-whats. There has never been anything done by man on a computer that didn't become a bottomless pit of time and expense in the longrun - even though it may look like a good idea at the time. Picture quality, resolution, etc. - well, I don't really care. Some of the most compelling pictures today are made with cheap plastic lensed Holgas. If and when the time ever comes that film is truly dead, I would rather give up photography than have it become one more thing I have to use a computer for.

  7. #47
    bjorke's Avatar
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    A *shoebox*??? I have a tall cabinet that's over-filled, and that doesn't count the many negs that "disappeared" when I got divorced nearly a decade ago.

    Digital is not going to disappear. It's not BAD, quite the opposite. But it has its own character. There is space and strength for both.

    Storage is a bugaboo for digital -- a stack of CDs is harder to sort-through that a binder full of negative pages. It needs more long-term maintenance too.

    KB
    (currently torn between buying a 14mm lens for his digital EOS or a 21mm for his 35mm Contax...)

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  8. #48
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    Again, Welcome!
    My first calculator did not even have a decimal point - you had to be able to figure that one in your head! My first computer (bought for my kids) was 16k upgraded from 4K and had to be programmed by hand in basic. You could save programs on a cassette tape. My oldest boy is now a computer engineer with a masters degree and my younger is a skilled user in the financial field and as a hobbyist. My oldest (a daughter) is a software specialist in library systems. None of them wanted to follow in their father's footsteps (Ob/Gyn) due to the lifestyle and hours involved (probably the reason I have not yet submitted any images). I am certainly glad they have the opportunity to do these things!

    John
    John Harvey
    Colorado Springs, CO
    harveyje@usa.net

  9. #49
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harveyje
    None of them wanted to follow in their father's footsteps (Ob/Gyn) due to the lifestyle and hours involved (probably the reason I have not yet submitted any images).
    Hmm. Might be interesting to discuss "Fine Art Nudes", or is that a little like "Coals to Newcastle"?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #50
    Aggie's Avatar
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