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  1. #1
    jrong's Avatar
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    Greetings everyone,

    Just to say hello from the UK - an analogue photographer's forum is a gem indeed, in this digital-crazy world. I'm very interested in landscape photography in 35mm as well as medium format, but dabble in BW architecture/street photography as well. Am hoping to learn how to develop my own negatives next year, so far have been constrained by lack of knowledge as well as a poorly functioning extractor fan!

    Very glad to have found this place,

    Jin

  2. #2
    clogz's Avatar
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    Stunning pics, J.R.!
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  3. #3

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    Jin, I think you've definately found the right place to learn! I've already started asking my list of dumb questions. Learn something new in every post I've read so far.

    ~edye
    One should really use the camera, as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind.-Dorothea Lange

  4. #4
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    Oh, my, analog anarchy in the U.K.

    Welcome to the forum,
    juan

  5. #5

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    Jin

    Welcome to the forum and the precious few from the UK. I admire your monochrome selection and hope to see more submissions on the gallery pages

    Phill
    Norwich,UK

    Juan
    Its anarchy alright.
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  6. #6
    Ole
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    Nice "dabbling", Jin.

    Please explain to me what extractor fans have to do with film development? I can't remember having had one, and I've done all my own developing for the past 25 years...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  7. #7
    jrong's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your warm welcomes.

    Hi Ole, hmm the only room I have that is vaguely suitable for a darkroom is very poorly ventilated. I've heard that developing chemicals can wreak havoc on sensitive lungs and so I thought I'd better get my extractor fan working properly before I indulge in any experimentation! Hope this makes sense. I don't know the first thing about developing, but thought I might get into it because I'm tired of shelling out 10 quid at the pro lab just for processing BW negs.

    Jin

  8. #8
    Ole
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    Fumes are only a problem with tray development, and not necessarily even then. The problem increases proportionally with tray area and temperature, so my 9 1/2 x 12" trays at 20°C are no problem unless I use really strong or noxious chemicals - which I don't.

    For film development, all you need is a Paterson tank and a reel, a beaker and a bottle. A changing bag is nice if you don't have a properly dark room. Load film on reel, put in tank, close tank. Mix developer (use liquid concentrate, and use one-shot), pour in tank. Develop as per instruction or habit. Dump developer, fill tank with water, agitate, dump. Fill tank with fix from bottle (that's what it's for), agitate or whatever as per instructions again. Pour fix back in bottle. This is the only chemical I reuse. Then wash as per Ilford method, hang to dry.

    All in all, you get a 10 square centimeter area exposed to air for a minute at most (developer). Fume problem? Nonexistent. The fixer smells worse, but is less hazardous.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #9
    jrong's Avatar
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    Sounds complicated, but I'm sure it'll be fun when I learn how to do it. I'm relieved to know I won't have a fume problem though. Thanks Ole, for the crash course. :-)

    Jin

  10. #10
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrong
    Sounds complicated, but I'm sure it'll be fun when I learn how to do it. I'm relieved to know I won't have a fume problem though. Thanks Ole, for the crash course.
    I too, doubt that there will be much of a problem. The idea of photographic chemistry being intensely irritating is far overblown. The only chemical I use that seems to be noticeable at all is glacial acetic acid (diluted for stop bath), and that is as intense as common table vinegar - diluted at that.
    I can't even notice any "fumes" from Color Kit chemicals.

    All that said, there is still the possibility of individual hypersensitivity. It is possible that someone could react unfavorably to any chemical - even white vinegar diluted 1:1 with water. Not likely, but possible.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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