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Thread: New to Film

  1. #1

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    New to Film

    Hello Everyone

    Not sure if i posted this in the right section if not im sorry. Well im new here and I have been shooting digital SLR for more than a year now. I finally decided to start shooting some film at the same time and learn how film cameras work.

    I have no information about film cameras and I donít even know how to work with one. So thatís why im here to get some tips and information from you guys.

    Well I have been searching around Flickr and have found many film cameras that seem interesting both SLR and non SLR. Here is a list I made of the cameras I can afford and seem to be the best ones. I might be wrong and you guys might have something better in mind for me.


    Canon AE-1
    Canon EOS 500
    Canon A-1
    Nikon FM2

    Olympus OM-1
    Holga 120cfn
    Canonet G-III, QL-17
    FED 2 Leica
    Pentax Spotmatic

    I was also searching around the web I found a beauty. The Mamiya C330. Iím not sure if thatís a good option for me or not but I just love those shots that are taken by this camera. So right now im thinking of Mamiya as my first option. If not I would go with the small films from the list above. But I have no idea how the Mamiya C330 works, well not that I do know anything about other film cameras.

    Iím gonna start with couple of questions

    1- From the list which camera do you think is the best? Do you think the Mamiya C330 is a good option for me or is it just to professional and hard to work with as a beginner.
    2- Iím NOT planning on printing my rolls. I just want to upload them on CD so I can give it a nice touch using photoshop and upload it on my photography photostream. Iím not planning to print any rolls mainly because it costs a lot. Is it possible to have your rolls only uploaded on a CD? Is the quality going to be any good like same quality as the Digital SLR shots?
    3- I have heard there are scanners that can scan your film if Iím not wrong. How does a scanner work? Like lets say the Epson Perfection V500 Photo Scanner. Do you just put the roll inside and it scans it for you? Sorry I just donít know anything about film so my bad if the questions sounds stupid

    Also this will be my first time using a film camera. Is there any articles i can start reading until i receive the camera? I dont know anything about rewinding the film and i have heard that you can ruin the film if you expose it to light and some other things and im not sure how you work with one properly to avoid any problems. I also have no idea how the focusing on a film works and as for the aperture and everything i have always been using digital and well with SLR the camera does it all but with film is different. I need to know what im doing so i guess i need some reading to do.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ibiza19 View Post
    1-From the list which camera do you think is the best? Do you think the Mamiya C330 is a good option for me or is it just to professional and hard to work with as a beginner.
    There is no "best", they are all very capable cameras with different modes of use and strengths. But yes, the C330 is a very good option, because...

    2-Iím NOT planning on printing my rolls. I just want to upload them on CD so I can give it a nice touch using photoshop and upload it on my photography photostream. Iím not planning to print any rolls mainly because it costs a lot. Is it possible to have your rolls only uploaded on a CD? Is the quality going to be any good like same quality as the Digital SLR shots?
    .,..if you are going to scan and don't want to spend a lot of money on a scanner then I would shoot medium format, and...

    3-I have heard there are scanners that can scan your film if Iím not wrong. How does a scanner work? Like lets say the Epson Perfection V500 Photo Scanner. Do you just put the roll inside and it scans it for you? Sorry I just donít know anything about film so my bad if the questions sounds stupid?
    ... a flatbed scanner such as the epson will do much better with medium format film than 35mm. You just load the film into a holder and scan away, very easy. Note that the old 4990 will do just about as well.

    Also this will be my first time using a film camera. Is there any articles i can start reading until i receive the camera? I dont know anything about rewinding the film and i have heard that you can ruin the film if you expose it to light and some other things and im not sure how you work with one properly to avoid any problems. I also have no idea how the focusing on a film works and as for the aperture and everything i have always been using digital and well with SLR the camera does it all but with film is different. I need to know what im doing so i guess i need some reading to do.
    You'll find absolutely everything you need right here, and you can probably find a local expert by searching for one on APUG. You can get a very fast start if you spend a few minutes with an experienced film user.

    Do consider doing your own printing. If nothing else, you could shoot medium format and make your own cyanotypes. It's quick, inexpensive, a lot of fun, can be done without an enlarger, and at the very least it gives you quick "proofs" for b&w negatives that you can develop in plain water. Consider also the hybrid / digital neg approach if you don't want to enlarge... you can learn about that on APUG's sister site, hybridphoto.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Do consider doing your own printing. If nothing else, you could shoot medium format and make your own cyanotypes. It's quick, inexpensive, a lot of fun, can be done without an enlarger, and at the very least it gives you quick "proofs" for b&w negatives that you can develop in plain water. Consider also the hybrid / digital neg approach if you don't want to enlarge... you can learn about that on APUG's sister site, hybridphoto.
    thank you keithwms for the response..very helpful

    some questions after reading your response..

    - how much does a flatbed scanner like epson costs? if i dont get the scanner how much would it be to scan these pictures outside? no prints just the roll being uploaded on a CD? any difference in picture quality comparing these two methods?

    - the C330 seems very hard to work with. Is this true? I have heard that you can expose your film to light and ruin the rolls and everything. And im scared i might screw up my camera or my rolls when i get the camera at the beginning. (sorry if this is a stupid questions im just dont know anything about film)

    - i live in canada, is there a list for local experts in Canada as well here?

    - and i didnt get anything about the last part :rolleyes:

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    1 - From the list I would go with the Nikon FM2, solid, reliable, tons of lenses etc for it. The C330 is a larger format and will produce nicer pics, but is more difficult/expensive to get processed and scanned if you are not doing it yourself.
    2 - Yes, several places can develop/scan B&W, most places can develop/scan color.
    3 - Yes, you can get scanners like the V500 you mention which are flatbeds which happen to scan negatives/slides too, or if you go 35mm you can get a dedicated film scanner like a PlusTek 7200. You put in the cut negatives (or mounted slides) and go to town.

    Most of the older 35mm cameras will have an owner's manual, including some online, so I would start there. If you can not find one for the FM2 specifically, the rewind procedure for the FG, FA, FM, FM2, FG20, EM, etc are all the same.

    Allan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flea77 View Post
    1 - From the list I would go with the Nikon FM2, solid, reliable, tons of lenses etc for it. The C330 is a larger format and will produce nicer pics, but is more difficult/expensive to get processed and scanned if you are not doing it yourself.
    2 - Yes, several places can develop/scan B&W, most places can develop/scan color.
    3 - Yes, you can get scanners like the V500 you mention which are flatbeds which happen to scan negatives/slides too, or if you go 35mm you can get a dedicated film scanner like a PlusTek 7200. You put in the cut negatives (or mounted slides) and go to town.

    Most of the older 35mm cameras will have an owner's manual, including some online, so I would start there. If you can not find one for the FM2 specifically, the rewind procedure for the FG, FA, FM, FM2, FG20, EM, etc are all the same.

    Allan
    1- Why is it more expensive? doesn't it use the same set of rolls as the other film cameras?
    2- Sounds good
    3- how do these scanners work? do i have to take the roll apart? or do i just put it inside the scanner and the scanner does the job for me? like if im supposed to take the roll apart wouldn't it get ruined because its exposed to light?

  6. #6
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    Hi Ibiza,

    Welcome to APUG.

    The C330 shoots 120 (medium format) film, a larger format than 35mm with fewer exposures per sqi inch of film, but higher quality, so it is more expensive because it uses more film per image.

    We aren't really in to discussing scanning here, but all your questions about film and cameras etc. are very on topic.

    Scanning details are discussed by many very talented and experienced photographers on our sister site hybridphoto.com

    We are an all analog discussion here.

  7. #7
    AgX
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    Ibiza, wherever you are situated, there is a good chance to get hold of some second hand basic techniques books on photography from the pre-digital era. Two authors of several wide spread books are Freeman and Langford.

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    Since your questions are fairly broad, I've moved this thread from the rangefinder forum to the Introductions forum. Welcome to APUG, ask questions, use the search function... you'll find it a very helpful community.

  9. #9
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    Go for the Mamiya. It's a great camera and I think fantastic for a starter. If nothing else, just staring at it should serve to inspire you. Start reading the magazine. The link is below. Start with the May issue. And welcome to APUG.
    Thank you.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ibiza19 View Post
    1- Why is it more expensive? doesn't it use the same set of rolls as the other film cameras?
    2- Sounds good
    3- how do these scanners work? do i have to take the roll apart? or do i just put it inside the scanner and the scanner does the job for me? like if im supposed to take the roll apart wouldn't it get ruined because its exposed to light?
    Welcome to APUG. Nice to see more new people here. You've came to the right place.

    Jason answered the first one. Just because it uses 120 film. The ones eveyone is used to see is 135/35mm film.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium_format_(film)
    There you can see the difference of size, and here, there's a roll of this film:
    http://www.danmassey.co.uk/theoryimages/120film.JPG
    The film is spooled on a spool, and has a backing paper that protects it from light.

    If you get a medium format camera, you won't have to worry about starting MF. I'd go for it.

    A flatbed scanner that scans film works just like your office or the one you use with your computer. But it's got a back lit that lights the film for scanning.

    No, you scan after develop, when the film is no more light sensitive. Developing the film, fixes the "latent image" that got exposed in the camera.
    Let me explain further; Film, basically has got silver crystals that when exposed to light, they react, making a latent image (that can be modified, if exposed to light it will change). Processing the film, changes the silver crystals for metallic silver, which is permanent and doesn't react to light. This would be in B&W, color is a much more complex process, which I don't know and results in dyes.

    It's a bit hard to explain all the concepts, because it's simply a lot of stuff. I believe that I'm even confusing more. :rolleyes:

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