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  1. #1
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Hello from England.

    Hi, just a quick intro, my name is Andy (no! really?), I have been a 'hobbyist' photographer for close on thirty years. In that time I have managed to become in no way an expert!

    I use several different cameras all 35mm format. A couple of old Zenit SLRs, a more recent Praktica SLR, a couple of Olympus compacts (an XA2 and a mju zoom) and my first camera an old Zorki 4K rangefinder which is still giving sterling service after all these years! I like to experiment with photographs, ie attempting to photograph lightning (never yet managed it!) or long exposures of clouds crossing the moon. I also like landscape, architectural and plain old documentary photography. Lets be honest, I just like taking photographs!

    I am relatively new to the internet (only been online for 10 months) and in that time I have been a member of a couple of other 'photography' forums. However, I have recently become disillusioned with the prevalance of digital 'photography' and digital manipulation. I don't know how well this will be percieved on APUG but my aversion to digital also extends to the use of Photoshop and similar programs. (you should see the seven(!) pages of protest and personal attacks against me on one particular forum when I said I didn't like photoshop!) I guess my view is, how do you learn to take photographs, how do you learn from mistakes, if you have Photoshop and its' ilk to fix things all the time?

    I prefer photos which were achieved using a camera, film and the developing process.

    Anyhow, thats me, and thats my view of photography. Hope I'm not too extreme in my views for you all! It took me a long time to find an analogue photography forum, I really don't want to rock the boat here!

  2. #2
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Hi Andy!

    I'm from Wisconsin, US. One year they had a great tourism slogan that I think fits perfectly here so I will *modify* it to fit...

    "Welcome to APUG! You're among friends!"

    Wow with all those cameras! I hope you do not lug all of them around with you! haha You know I think there's someone on this list who has taken some phenomenal shots of lightning. He took them over a mining area. I'll let you know if I remember who it is!

    Jeanette

  3. #3
    papagene's Avatar
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    Andy,
    Welcome aboard. []
    Your views on digital photography are like preaching to the choir here. That is why we are all here. We share your love for the tradition, skill, craft and final product, the photograph, tangible and beautiful.
    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  4. #4
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Thanks for the welcome folks!

    Any info on lightning photography would be gratefully recieved! I figure it's easy enough to shoot lightning at night as you can use the B setting and hope the camera is pointing the right way. However, shooting lightning in daylight is another matter entirely!

    Who knows, I may finally after all these years get really adventurous and set up my own b+w darkroom too!

    Having seen the quality of photograph in the various galleries here, I must admit joining is somewhat daunting! I hope I can do the site justice!

  5. #5
    Leon's Avatar
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    hello from just over the estuary in Kent ... good to have you here

  6. #6
    roy
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    Welcome. I hope you enjoy this forum.
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  7. #7
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K
    However, shooting lightning in daylight is another matter entirely!
    Whoo! First of all, I'd use a camera with a really fast winder. I'd probably prefer to have a huge magazine as well, so I could put one whole 30m roll of film in it. Then sit and wait for a whopping great storm . I guess you would ideally like the "landscape" to be about one to two stops underexposed to emphasise the lightning. That normally means shurt shutter times, which reduces the chance of actually catching the lightning. Human reflexes aren't exactly lightning fast... Or you could use long shutter times, which means small aperture, slow film and probably a couple of ND filters. I don't know if lightning is bright enough to show up clearly on top of a 1-minute exposure, but that's where I'd start. Unless I were shooting movie, of course...


    Anyway: Welcome to APUG, and I hope you'll enjoy us here
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #8
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    Lightning is bright enough to show up at any f stop you use. I think the best way to do lightning is time exposures, so a small aperture is used. I usually check the timing of the bursts and if it is close to regular in that area of the sky (and it often is) I use that as a basis for when to start the exposure. Fer' instance I see an approximate 30 second space between bursts I'll count twenty seconds then open the shutter. Close when you see enough light in the sky to suit you.
    Gary Beasley

  9. #9
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips people. I will use them on my next attempt. :-) I was also thinking I would shoot using B+W with a red filter to help slow down the shutter speed.

    I have some 25 and 50ASA film on order. I have wet weather gear in the back of the car, plastic bag, tape and tripod ready for the camera. I have a hilltop with a ruined castle ready (I figure that is my best locale for lightning shots as the lightning would be more likely to strike the castle than it would me!)...

    now, if anyone has a tip for conjuring up a doozy of a storm... ;-)


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  10. #10

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    Andy,

    I must disagree with those who are suggesting a small apperture and long exposure during daylight hours. I've done that a few times and always been disappointed with the results.

    Just as during the evening, an aperture of around f5.6 or f8 (with 100 iso film) is needed to capture the lightning as a bright flash. A smaller aperture may be used if the lightning is REALLY close, but you shouldn't aim to be that close anyway, for safety reasons.

    I have tried often to capture lightning during the day, with little success due to my lack of lightning reflexes. My one successful day (see http://www.goldeneyephoto.com/Evolution/index.html) came about because the lightning was strobing several times over a second on each strike.

    I recommend setting your camera to f5.6 or f8 and exposure times of 1/8s or 1/15s and hope your reflexes and the type of lightning work for you. You might also fork out for one of those lightning triggers that opens the shutter for you (saving about 0.3 seconds of delay). Captures are rare and often disappointing, but you will work that out for yourself with time. The best shots are always after the sun has set, when you can use the right aperture and a long exposure time.

    Now, to conjour up a storm, plan a wedding for the day and place that you want to photograph ......

    Graeme

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