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  1. #21

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    don't forget to have fun !
    john
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  2. #22
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by portrait_giver View Post
    Hi folks, just wanted to introduce myself. I'm Jennifer, hailing from Adelaide (South Australia). I'm a professional digital photographer, but when it comes to film, I get nervous. If I may be honest. I've come here with the hope to learn more about film, and to get inspired all-round.

    If you could only have one tip for someone that is about to make some serious mess with film, what would it be? ;-)

    Nice to meet you all. Cheers.
    Just remember, every time the film advances your camera gets a new sensor.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by portrait_giver View Post
    If you could only have one tip for someone that is about to make some serious mess with film, what would it be? ;-)
    One tip, hah.

    Three in order of importance.

    1- Understand that it is different, don't try to duplicate digital. Embrace the differences. This is true of the look and the workflow. Jose Villa's business is a great example of how to use film and a lab to get client ready, color corrected stuff (including scans), without doing any backend work.

    2- Understand it's flexibility. Buy a few disposable cameras and a Holga and go shoot something. Do a good job of composition, shoot at noon, shoot in early evening. Notice that you can get really fun stuff over a wide range of brightness without adjusting f-stop or time. The Holga is basically 1 step up from disposable, you get to set focus by scale and choose the film. Mine rewards me nicely every time I use it. The lens for me is the magic, quite sharp in the middle, softer with a vignette around the edges, no computer required.

    3- Given your bias toward portraits I'd get and use a handheld incident meter for everything. This will allow you to accurately use any film in any camera that can adjust aperture and time without guessing or learning a new system. This opens up a whole range of choices on what lens to put in front of your film.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #24

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    Hi all, thanks so much for the responses, and I'm sorry it took so long to come back in here and post. I just got back from a one week holiday and I took the plunge and LEFT THE DSLR AT HOME. I was pretty nervous but excited about the possibilities. Took the old Pentax K1000 and Pentax SF10 - the latter I hadn't used before on manual. Left my light meter at home by accident though. Lol. Took 8 rolls. However, towards end of holiday, the K1000 konked out! Couldn't believe it. Shutter stopped opening. (Not sure whether I should try and get it fixed or just move on.) Anyway, film-wise, I kept it simple and just used Fuji film, and then Ilford b&w for the camera that broke. Looking forward to seeing the results but if they suck then I ain't posting anything here. Hehe. Cheers!

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by portrait_giver View Post
    Looking forward to seeing the results but if they suck then I ain't posting anything here. Hehe. Cheers!
    You are in good company.

    I think it was Henri Catier-Bresson that said "the first 10,000 shots are the hardest." At least something close to that.

    We all struggle.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #26
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    Hi and welcome to the clan. The one tip I'll give is to show the bad along with the good. It's the only true way to get productive feedback and learn what to do right. Enjoy yourself and have no fears of film.

    cheers
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  7. #27
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    My tip would be to buy a disposable camera and have fun, enjoyed? Take that wonderful K1000 and burn film, follow your heart and instinct.


    Enjoy!

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