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  1. #1

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    Need to learn more - have I come to the right place? ;-)

    Hi folks, just wanted to introduce myself. I'm Jennifer, hailing from Adelaide (South Australia). I'm a professional digital photographer, but when it comes to film, I get nervous. If I may be honest. I've come here with the hope to learn more about film, and to get inspired all-round.

    If you could only have one tip for someone that is about to make some serious mess with film, what would it be? ;-)

    Nice to meet you all. Cheers.

  2. #2
    segedi's Avatar
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    Just give it a shot! Or 36
    I have a lot I'd fun trying different things out - you'll learn a lot here. Welcome aboard.
    -----------------------

    Segedi.com

  3. #3
    nhemann's Avatar
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    Just remember that the rabbit hole is pretty deep, and getting lost is most of the fun....
    "There is no such thing as objective reality in a photograph"

    My flickr and (gasp!) dpug photos - take a look if you like.

  4. #4
    eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by portrait_giver View Post
    If you could only have one tip for someone that is about to make some serious mess with film, what would it be? ;-)
    My advice would be:
    Buy an all manual decent 35mm SLR.
    Learn how to use the meter. (when I taught, my students spent a week just metering, before they loaded film- some of them regretted signing up for the course- until later... ).
    Take notes on every single exposure you make. Record the f stop/shutter speed/filter/ etc. (anything influencing your exposure choices).
    Bracket your shots. ( I had my students do bracketing the same way, everytime. -2, -1, N, +1, +2).
    Carefully compare your notes to the images. You will learn a lot from this routine.

  5. #5

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    Do you already have a camera? Will you be doing your own processing? Are you interested primarily in B&W or Color (neg or slide) or both?

    Quote Originally Posted by portrait_giver View Post
    If you could only have one tip for someone that is about to make some serious mess with film, what would it be? ;-)
    To get over your nervousness, pick one camera and one film and use it as much as you can.

  6. #6
    zsas's Avatar
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    Welcome home! You will love analog! Take your time, as Eddie so eloquently outlined, and get the basics down. All too often when one learns digital, the process (i.e., photographic triangle, metering, etc.) is overlooked for the immediacy of snapping the shutter in auto and uploading to print is the process. Get the fundamentals down, take some shots, wash-rinse-repeat, all-the-while making improvements to the process (tech and artistic). The approach in analog is akin to incremental improvements as opposed to immediacy of getting an image back and deleting the 9 out of 10 that didn't work when shooting digital.

    You can do it!
    Last edited by zsas; 08-05-2011 at 11:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by portrait_giver View Post
    If you could only have one tip for someone that is about to make some serious mess with film, what would it be?
    Hi Jennifer,

    One tip only?

    As a general rule, traditional film-based photography is a much slower and more contemplative endeavor. The machines do a lot less thinking for you, so you have an opportunity to do a lot more of it for yourself. While you will still be looking to record fine imagery, that process often occurs as a much more measured exercise.

    So immerse yourself into and experience that deliberate pace. It's one of the most enjoyable and distinguishing characteristics of this medium.

    Best of luck and welcome to APUG.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #8

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    As somboby else implied, one film ( lots) and lots of notes. One film one camera one year

    Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk

  9. #9

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    Wow guys, I feel so welcome already. Thank you for all the tips so far.

    All manual: I have the Pentax k100 to start with...

  10. #10
    Dshambli's Avatar
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    Welcome to the dark (room) side of photography. I'm pretty new here too, and I have found this to be an extremely helpful and supportive (or is enabling a better word?) group of people.

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