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  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Thanks Peter.

    Ron

  2. #22

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    I think that process [we call it the Capstaff 2 color process] was a little earlier. My understanding was that it didn't go to maket because the dyes were only available in Germany and we were just entering the wat. Nevertheless...there might be something in our Kodak archives. Our photography collection have many of these including the negatives and single plates.

  3. #23

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    I think that process [we call it the Capstaff 2 color process] was a little earlier. My understanding was that it didn't go to maket because the dyes were only available in Germany and we were just entering the wat. Nevertheless...there might be something in our Kodak archives. Our photography collection have many of these including the negatives and single plates.

    I posted this in the wrong place before...whoops. As you can see, I don't go on forums very often.

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    Thanks Ian. Hope your work with emulsions is is bearing fruit.

  5. #25
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    I look forward to discussing this with you in person Mark.

    I believe Pinatype was earlier, c.a. 1907 off the top of my head(?). Capstaff's Kodachrome was in the 20's and used the same class of dyes. Indeed, if the specific dye class was disclosed in the archives somewhere it would solve a hundred year old mystery!, one that the likes of J.S. Friedman was keenly interested in knowing the answer to.

    It's entirely possible that it was disclosed at some point, but I doubt it and I'm not sure where that would be hidden.

    OK, sorry, going off on a tangent!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  6. #26
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    PINA is a standard reference used in classifying dye types. Dyes were given PINA numbrs to distinguish them by class and color, but IDK the methodology used. It is not very common today but is still used. PINA type was merely an early version IIRC.

    Capstaff's original work is fully documented in the KRL library where all notebooks are kept including mine and George Eastman's. IDK who is permitted access. I have been told I have access to parts of the library but most of even my own work is off limits to me now.

    PE

  7. #27
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    That's interesting about PINA classifications. But Friedman wrote a long rant (basically) on this topic in the mid 40's and I'm sure he would've known about this classification scheme. In fact I think it's in some of the Am. Photo papers I posted on the dye-imbibition article/thread.

    Perhaps it's a case of 'chicken or the egg'... that is, pinatype was a clever name to denote the use of dyes in the process.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

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