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  1. #71

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    When I don't understand something that many other people do, I try harder.

  2. #72
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Henri Cartier-Bresson ... said: "I've never been interested in the process of photography, never, never. Right from the beginning. For me, photography with a small camera like the Leica is an instant drawing." -Wikipedia.
    The High Museum recently had an Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibit "The Modern Century" which was put together by MOMA. The photographs show great imagination, but honestly, most of the prints were totally mediocre. The best ones were from the end of his life where he worked closely with a master printer. These are all signed big, with ink, and embossed, as well. (You can see this in the documentary available on Netflix.)

    Keith Carter is a very fine print maker who has always printed his own work, as well as an insanely great photographer. Roger Ballen is an amazing photographer who hasn't printed his own work in nearly 25 years, but he's worked with the same printer for all those years and they obviously have a good thing going. Michael Kenna uses assistants to help print.

    Lee Friedlander printed his own work for years, but his most recent work, some of the best of his very long life, is printed by someone else. Irving Penn's work was largely printed by others, as was Avedon's. These guys were so busy making photographs that the printing had to be done by someone else or it would never get done at all. Does anyone care who printed Avedon's work? No, it's AVEDON.

    There are plenty of "print makers" who can process their film to a tenth of a stop and make gorgeous prints of nothing worth looking at. Many people get caught up in the "process" and never get the "why" and the "what." They simply see that Weston was at Big Sur and the photos were awesome so it must have been Pyro and Amidol and Big Sur, NOT Weston.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
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  3. #73
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    Many people get caught up in the "process" and never get the "why" and the "what." They simply see that Weston was at Big Sur and the photos were awesome so it must have been Pyro and Amidol and Big Sur, NOT Weston.
    +1
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #74
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I liked the hunter/cook analogy. I thought about the comparison of photography and food last week.

    For what kind of chef would you go out of your way to experience their food? If I was a chef instead of photographer, would anyone bother to come back?

    I am sure HCB was a hunter. John Morris talking about the photographer's eye said "It's a pleasure to look at the contact sheets of Cartier-Bresson, especially so because he doesn't like to lend them out! But, they show his search, his probing of subject matter. It's fascinating to see the way he works."

  5. #75
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Preesh.

    And let's not forget art history: all of the great painters, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Caravaggio, etc. had ateliers where apprentices would undertake all sorts of "boring" and laborious tasks such as the underpainting. Fast forward to Warhol and Koons, etc. who have their assistants do much of the mechanical work of putting the art together. How would bronzes ever get made? Can one man alone cast 500 pounds of molten metal?

    It's the idea that matters. Right now, all of my paying portrait work is done with Canon digital and output either on lightjet or inkjet printers. Once it leaves Photoshop, it is an almost entirely mechanical process. Alec Soth, for instance, now scans his negatives and outputs on HP inkjet. Is it not art?

    Again, it's the idea that matters. The final art object -- whether a silver gelatin print, a painting, or a silk screened wooden box -- is merely the physical manifestation of the idea, and is, of course, part of the original idea itself.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
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  6. #76
    Aristophanes's Avatar
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    Somewhere I read that HCB's "decisive moment" concept was meant to apply to the viewing of the photograph and not just its moment of capture. My understanding is he saw himself more as a photojournalist of culture and the zeitgeist apart from the fussiness of the fine art world. If he was a hunter he used a shotgun.

  7. #77
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
    If he was a hunter he used a shotgun.
    I don't know, he was a very stealthy guy... I think he was more of a sniper than a shotgun shooter
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #78
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    One of the things that draws me to what I think of as classic photography is being able to take responsibility for the entire creative process, from visualizing a picture to final presentation. I derive a great deal of satisfaction from composing an image, exposing and developing a good negative, crafting a good print that expresses what I felt when I first saw the picture in my mind, all the way to matting and framing the print. Some of it is art, some of it science, some of it simply math, but if it works I get all the credit and if it fails I will gladly accept the blame.

    But that's just me.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

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    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  9. #79
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    When a post discusses HCB, lets just remind ourselves in visual terms what we are talking about -

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Guss25YP-U...-Bresson00.jpg

    Can any memember of APUG produce a picture like this?
    I saw this and immediately thought of some of Nicole's work.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #80
    MattKing's Avatar
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    As many have posted, it depends on the photographer (and the printer).

    I have done a fair amount of printing for others, although I certainly wouldn't describe myself as a master printer.

    IMHO, there is nothing that will improve your printing as much as printing for others.

    Photography is about many things, but communication is one of the most important.

    Photographers who can communicate that can, with the help of a talented and perceptive printer, create better photographs.

    And printers who assist photographers with vision in turning that vision into great prints, can be invaluable as well.

    In my case, I really enjoy the darkroom. I truly believe that in my case, my experience printing aids my photographic vision, because it always helps me to have in mind the print's capacities when I'm creating the negative.

    It is much the same with transparency work - I find that if I don't have the projected transparency in mind when I take the shot, most likely it will come out mediocre.

    But that is me. If I didn't get the joy I get from printing, but had someone good working with me instead, I expect that I would be happy too.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2



 

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