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  1. #1
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    "Slit Scan" Photography

    This is the first time I have heard of this, how is it different from panning? And it's made with film.

    http://www.petapixel.com/2012/08/11/...finish-camera/

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    This certainly looks like a techno version of panning, but lacks the hand eye coordination which gives that human touch.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3
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    slit scan is kind of like panning with a time component. If you pan, you let in light for the instant of the shutter being open. With slit scan, it's more like a scanner where you are gathering light for a longer duration, but only recording a vertical slice of information. This becomes more apparent when you look at his carosel shot, which you could never do with panning because your time component would overlap. Another example is an image of two cars driving in opposite directions. One car is elongated because it is driving with the film, another car is compressed because it is driving against the film direction.

  4. #4

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    It's different from convential panning because only the film moves (at the same speed as the subject). The camera remains stationary.
    Here is another really interesting example, on 70mm film used in a modified Hasselblad;

    http://www.autoweek.com/article/20070223/free/70216011/



 

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