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  1. #11

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    I don't think his audience was other photographers. If other photographers like or dislike the images is irrelevant. He has gotten them into a major publication and probbably has gallery representation and sales of the work. As I pointed out in another thread the buying public for the most part does not give a hoot about the technical aspects of an image. If they like the work they will buy it. If a gallery owner thinks it will sell or bring people in he will show it.

    In a a previous issue of Lenswork, Brooks Jensen wrote an essay where he discussed how photographers and non-photographers had a totally different way of seeing his work. He felt if you cannot get a gallery owner to see your work have a non-photograper review it critique it.

    I think it is way to easy to fall into the trap of judging work based on the our own prejudices and preferences with regards to our methods, equipment and skill level.

    I can see how he has tried to use burning and dodging to add emphasis to the work. By placing those areas dramatically darker or lighter I think he is trying to convey a spiritual prescence of sorts animating the scene. Do I think it works? I don't know. I would have to see full size prints to get a real feeling. The subject matter in of itself is really nothing that gets me excited.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  2. #12
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    I, too, was startled at the heavyhandedness of Meriel's work. But then I'm also often surprised at the degree of overburning in the work of Clyde Butcher that seems to be more an act of carelessness than of artistic decision. That Brooks chose to look past what we (and certainly he), who can identify flaws as damning, and yet publish work that he found meritorius is courageous. In this case I wasn't impressed with his decision.
    Last edited by jovo; 01-21-2005 at 09:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  3. #13

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    There is a similar discussion in the LF forum. My opinion is that I have no problem with a heavy dramatic interpretation of a subject, to each his or her own. But I found the Meriel prints, or what I saw in the LW preview to be sloppily done. They remind me of the first time I tried to do burning, got the exact same results. Thank God I did not know then that was "artistic" or I would still be printing that way..

    We dont have to go too far to see a good heavy dramatic interpretation. I remember a few months back Les posted a picture that was heavily burned and dodged, but it was gorgeous. I cannot say the same of Meriel's work. I understand his audience might not be photographers, but then again it might be. If I had gone to a gallery and seen this work I would probably have asked the owner if he was kidding.

    I think there is a line between artisitic license and out right bad prints, IMO this work crossed that line, even if it was published in a good magazine.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    I can guarantee that what you see in LensWork is exactly what was submitted for publication. A great deal of effort work by Brooks insures that what is submitted is reproduced exactly in LensWork.
    I'll agree LW takes considerable care to reproduce the artists intent for contrast and style. Yet every image in LW is made up of two inks, black and warm grey on a relatively glossy paper. This is not consistent with the way every artists images appear in real life. Additionally the scanning process and plate making processes have limitations and can not exactly reproduce every nuance in an original print, so "exactness" is not even possible.

    The main argument for most others here is about the artists use of burning and dodging. I merely wanted to suggest the possibility of tones being exagerated in the reproduction process. One would need to see an original print to judge for sure.

    As an example see this link below. Notice there are two versions of two of the images.
    http://www.postercheckout.com/Pictur...ArtistID=12099
    Eric
    www.esearing.com

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