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  1. #31

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    Or you can buy a true silver print from the original neg printed by Alan Ross according to AA's original supervision.

  2. #32
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Last year the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville GA had a wonderful exhibit of Adams' prints, the majority of which he'd pulled, along with a full-sized mockup of his darkroom. Wonderful stuff, and yes, the prints glow and have palpable depth. In another part of the museum there was a display of large inkjet BW prints, probably made with John Cone's estimable inks, of Georgia scenes. They were very well done, but ... my wife commented that it was good that they weren't adjacent to Adam's work. The inkjet prints, while very good, couldn't compare with silver gelatin fiber based prints. Now, whether the fact that most of Adams' prints were from large format vs. the inkjets, probably from APC or full frame at best made a difference I don't know.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dinesh View Post
    I saw an AA exhibition in Toronto a few years ago and while the content wasn't my particular cup of tea, the printing was top notch. Someone at the time mentioned that while not the only reason, the the cadmium in the papers helped the image pop.

    If you ever get a chance to see Bob Carnies printing skills, you too will be amazed at what he can do with some very difficult negatives.

    Just be sure not to catch his reflection in the glass as it can be off putting.
    I doubt cadmium had anything to do with it. Cadmium salts were a component of warm tone papers of bygone years and he didn't print warm tone. In fact he says in The Print, in regard to Portriga, that "I do not generally respond to warm print values" (page 51 of my paperback edition) while pointing out that many people made wonderful prints on Portriga.

    We have better papers today than he did. It's not the instrument, it's the musician.

  4. #34

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    It's the instrument plus the musician, Roger. I don't think that every cello player in the philharmonic would be happy thumping a gut bucket
    string. Ansel used the best papers he could find, just like most of us. And BW's work was so significantly improved when Seagull G came out, he ordered a personalized car license plate with "SEAGULL" on it. But AA's oldest living assistant, still printing in his 90's, certainly bifurcated on the question of warm papers, and threw quite a fit when Portriga was discontinued. I see his son-in-law on almost a daily basis, who lives with him. It was quite awhile till MGWT came out, which seems capable of competently filling that niche, plus more. I never interacted with AA personally - he was already old and sick when I first got into the game.

  5. #35
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Nothing to do with the original capture then?
    Sure, taking a shot is important but, unless you are doing reversal, the only thing you get from taking a shot and developing it, is some "raw material" to work with.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #36

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    "Capture" involves a lot more than tripping the shutter, though that is obviously essential. Most of it is cerebral, both consciously and subconsciously. It's a lot like trying to raise butterflies. You go through profound changes between the larva, pupa, and full adult drying its wings in the sun. I don't regard an image as even existing until the print is precisely trimmed and mounted, because even a millimeter or two
    difference of final cropping will affect whether I consider it actually my own image or not. The print itself is the subject. No photograph is the
    "rea"l world, but a personalized interpretation of some minute portion and chronological instant of it. But to share that it has to be made tangible, and preferably in as articulate manner as is possible ... Otherwise just how much can you really communicate? Just how much of a
    symphony can you convey with a kazoo anyway?

  7. #37

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    I'm sorry to say this but Mr. Clive MAY just here to bait others into controversy...if you don't see the difference in a silver gelatin print there are lots of other places on the internet to hang out. I'll gladly pay anyones admission to a major retrospective at a museum to see the real thing.
    have a great day everyone
    Best, Peter
    website down for maintenance!

  8. #38
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    It's the instrument plus the musician, Roger. I don't think that every cello player in the philharmonic would be happy thumping a gut bucket
    string. Ansel used the best papers he could find, just like most of us. And BW's work was so significantly improved when Seagull G came out, he ordered a personalized car license plate with "SEAGULL" on it. But AA's oldest living assistant, still printing in his 90's, certainly bifurcated on the question of warm papers, and threw quite a fit when Portriga was discontinued. I see his son-in-law on almost a daily basis, who lives with him. It was quite awhile till MGWT came out, which seems capable of competently filling that niche, plus more. I never interacted with AA personally - he was already old and sick when I first got into the game.
    Granted that a world class musician isn't likely to make, say, a bass out of a washtub, broomstick and piece of rope. But we do have really superb papers now.

  9. #39
    Truzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Schrager View Post
    I'll gladly pay anyones admission to a major retrospective at a museum to see the real thing.
    have a great day everyone
    Best, Peter
    Does this apply to people who agree with you?

    Last night I was organizing some color snapshots from 2008, and found that "depth" again. Just 35mm, wide-angle lens, and Walgreen's processing and printing. I have a wet-print from digital that my Aunt took of me this summer, and it is flat. Sharp and saturated, like a slide, but flat, unlike a slide. It looks like she took a picture of a cardboard cut-out of me.

    I'm not saying all digital photos are bad, but there is a difference; and you don't need a professional or a museum to see the difference.
    Truzi

  10. #40

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    Roger - back when I was pretty young I imported and sold a lot of hand tools. (Nowadays it's mostly expensive German and Japanese power
    equipment). That was back when carpenters still used a lot of traditional hand saws. But one particular model was made specifically for musicians. They were rather rare, were beautifully polished and chromed, and you could hypothetically cut lumber with em just like ordinary
    saws. But the quality and temper of the steel was all together a different thing. We tool people could tell the difference by how they "twanged" and reverberated. I got good enough at it to make dogs howl for several blocks around. But one day a concert musician showed up with his violin bow, actually in his black tailed coat and white bowtie, played tunes on some of these, then finally purchased one. So somewhere out there, someone is probably making a special gut bucket for the redneck philharmonic too.

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