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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    The current mayor of my town, Darren Lyons, was a UK-based pararazzi (Big Pictures) and made around $30 million a year before selling out a few years back and returning home (where he was once a humble newspaper photographer). He is a very flamboyant and showy character (frills, rhinestones, mohawk hair tied and dyed...). All paparazzi have a skid mark against their name: it didn't go down well that he was the one who personally went up to photograph Princess Diana at the accident scene, print the images out, flog them off to the tabloids and refuse to destroy the negatives because they were a valuable income stream. Something to think about re morality.
    I always thought of him as the Australian version of Max Clifford, but without the court case implications.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Usher Fellig, an early paparazzi, is today celebrated as a groundbreaking artist, credited as a primary influence by Diane Arbus. No millions for him. He worked the night shift and lived in a tiny, decrepit apartment next door to Frank Lava's gun shop in NYC.

    Ken
    Some of the pictures Weegee took had dubious moral implications, such as:-

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=we...2F%3B240%3B204

    I believe he placed the steering wheel in the dead man's hand to associate the death with a car accident. No press photographer today could get away with that.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #13

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    Taking photograph of someone in a situation where the subject does not want to be seen, and doing so knowing it will cause that person great grief, harm, or embarasement is not my idea of great job, great work, or moral behavior.

    I have no idea why many seem to be fascinated with an image of royal's butt....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    The current mayor of my town, Darren Lyons, was a UK-based pararazzi (Big Pictures) and made around $30 million a year before selling out a few years back and returning home (where he was once a humble newspaper photographer). He is a very flamboyant and showy character (frills, rhinestones, mohawk hair tied and dyed...). All paparazzi have a skid mark against their name: it didn't go down well that he was the one who personally went up to photograph Princess Diana at the accident scene, print the images out, flog them off to the tabloids and refuse to destroy the negatives because they were a valuable income stream. Something to think about re morality.
    Hindsight can be a wonderful thing, most of the paps on the scene of the crash would have taken pictures - not knowing the outcome - that was their "job". Those that got the films away all offered them for sale but once the death was public the nature of the story altered and the editors did their job, they edited the pictures and did not publish. They may well appear but most likely in a historic context, like time-limited u.k. government cabinet papers. Just because the edn outcome was tragic does not mean that the image required to be edited at point of capture.

    The sports photographers who shot the heysel football stadium stampede, hillsborough football stadium crush, jock stein fatal heart attack on the pitch or sennas f1 crash are not vilified for doing their job and taking pictures of an event that later transpires to be differently tragic, in all those cases the editors did their job and edited from publication the gruesome pictures that exist - and still exist in the archives.

    I have never seen a published picture with diana injured inside the car.

  5. #15
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Some of the pictures Weegee took had dubious moral implications...

    I believe he placed the steering wheel in the dead man's hand to associate the death with a car accident.
    He reportedly also often dropped his own fedora into a scene because, according to him, the viewing public liked to see the stiff's hat.

    He was more a NYC tabloid (paparazzi) photographer than a mainstream press photographer. No morals involved. Only the desire (and skill set) to walk away with the money shot by doing whatever was necessary. Not so different from contemporary paparazzi.

    Yet today he's considered an artist.

    Ken
    "When making a portrait, my approach is quite the same as when I am portraying a rock. I do not wish to impose my personality upon the sitter, but, keeping myself open to receive reactions from his own special ego, record this with nothing added: except of course when I am working professionally, when money enters in,—then for a price, I become a liar..."

    — Edward Weston, Daybooks, Vol. II, February 2, 1932

  6. #16
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Another trick in the old B&W days was to dump a bucket of water on the scene -- in greyscale it'd look like blood.

    I could never do what the pros do, with the celeb type of work - takes a certain personality type. I won't judge them but it's against my view of what photography is...the final word is this: they wouldn't do it if the demand (ie. US) didn't want it so badly.
    And don't kid yourself about the celebrities either -- they play that system like a fiddle.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  7. #17
    Kyle M.'s Avatar
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    Personally I could care less what the celebs are up to, I don't keep up with who's doing this or that, who's dating who and all that B.S., I could care less. But when it comes to celebs complaining about, or flipping out on the paparrazi I feel like it's all staged, the only reason you become that famous is because you want the attention, and by throwing a fit about it you get even more attention. I believe in freedom and I believe you should damn well be able to take a picture of whoever you want in public.
    Mamiya 645/Mamiya-Sekor 80mm F=2.8C, Canon FTb/Canon 50mm F=1.4, Polaroid 450.

  8. #18
    AgX
    AgX is online now

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    One of those paparazzi photographers (a german guy working in the US) wrote a book about his experiences. So you can learn from firsthand.

  9. #19

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    OP, not for me. I couldn't take the wait time. I get bored after 5 minutes in the same spot.

  10. #20
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    I don't have too much respect for any of them, but I can at least credit some skill and timing to the early ones who shot film and could get two or three pictures, maybe only one.
    The modern ones just stand there and let the camera focus and set the exposure and then hit the button taking eight pictures per second through a multi-thousand dollar fast, long zoom. Then a little of the old post processing.
    Wow, I'm impressed, that takes skill.

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