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  1. #11

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    I felt much the same as Bob did upon seeing Reichman's work at Pikto. There's such a huge difference between a web based photograph and the actual goods hanging on the walls. I found the prints to be lacking in quality, and in some cases even poorly executed. One street portrait in particular was so badly dodged in the face area (which, judging by the light in the scene, was in deep shadow) that it almost looked drawn on. I'm no photoshop guru, or master printer for that matter, but it screamed out 'shoddy work'. I certainly wouldn't accept that on one of my prints, whether it was hanging in a gallery or not.

    The overall trend was: over-enlarged, too much noise reduction, and a subject matter that has been done in the past quite well. The camera club comparison is spot on.

    Ed Burtynsky's images on the same subject had me hypnotized last year at the Art Gallery of Ontario. I went back 3 times and dragged friends with me. I had a quick look at Reichman's stuff on my way to pick up prints of my own, and they hardly registered.

    I'm not trying to bash the guy... But it's something about the way the Luminous Landscape webpage beats it's chest and proclaims itself significant that rubs me the wrong way.

    To throw out a few well trodden expressions: "the proof is in the pudding" and "take it with a grain of salt". With these in mind, I've not visited LL since I saw those prints on the wall.

  2. #12
    cao
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Buonocore
    To throw out a few well trodden expressions: "the proof is in the pudding"...
    I thought the well trodden expression was "the proof of the pudding is in the eating."

  3. #13

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    As someone who actually knows (and likes) Michael, I felt this thread warranted a reply.

    1. Michael's "shtick", as far as I can determine, is that he's a guy who both loves photography and the tools of photography. Having reached a stage in his life (through talent and hard work) that he can pursue what he loves, he spends a great deal of time shooting, talking to people about shooting, playing with cameras, etc., simply because it pleases him. If only we could all be so lucky!

    2. Michael is not motivated by money, nor does he need whatever he makes from photo endeavours. That said, there is a certain genius in being able to go on terrific trips with interesting people to photograph in exotic places and make a few bucks doing it. Think about this: he sells out his workshops IN MINUTES at an average cost of $6-10K US. He could sell four or five times as many spaces, or sub-contract multiple trips, but does neither since this is a passion for him, not an industry.

    3. He doesn't make a dime from the camera manufacturers whose business he has either enhanced or damaged. From what I understand, he actually PAYS for his gear. He could take a LOT of freebies, but doesn't. Unlike the photomagazines that we have all stopped reading, he actually writes what he believes in his reviews. Whether you agree or not, at least he's honest and commercially unfettered.

    4. His visit to the ship-breaking yards was carefully pre-arranged through local contacts monts in advance -- there was no bluster-at-the-door. Moreover, b/c of horrific Bangladeshi traffic, he had about an hour of light before sunset in which to shoot. Burtynsky and Salgado were there MUCH longer than that. For what it's worth, I've been completely unmoved by Burtynsky's Chittagong pics, which I don;t think hold a candle to his Quarry photos -- again, a matter of taste.

    5. I agree that the Pikto show prints weren't his best. I had the pleasure of seeing his full set of 11x14 proofs, and there were, imho, many very strong images that didn't make the show -- all of much better print quality. But those are curatorial choices. For example, the Mangum exhibition currently on at Stephen Bulger's gallery is absolute crap --both in content and quality. That doesn't mean the photographers aren't "good", just that the show was week.

    As a final thought, perhaps what wrankles a lot of people is that Michael quite obviously doesn't give a **** what the chattering DPreview crowd think of him. His collected body of work is very strong and he spends his time doing things he enjoys with people he enjoys. It's a privileged position that more than a few would envy. Personally, I find it kind of inspiring. Each to their own.

    - N.

  4. #14
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    Ndevlin

    I neither know him and am indifferent to him, I have went to his website and was turned off . There was a lot of pre press about this picto show and I thought it worth while to view the hype, IMO the show was lacking and the print quality was not there. To say he has better images in his portfolio is much like the fish I left in the lake.
    I think the reference to the Burtinsky, Monk, Salgado exhibits is not so much about the horrible traffic in Bangladesh or his one hour of light to get the images, but the fact of not sticking around and maybe documenting this area in M Reichmans style , rather than a quick point and shoot and move off approach.
    I am sure he is a great guy and I know a lot of people buy into the LL package, I am just not one who does.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ndevlin
    DPreview crowd
    - N.
    What's a DPreview crowd?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    What's a DPreview crowd?
    http://www.dpreview.com/

  7. #17

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    Oh. I don't care what they think either.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #18

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    Such sour grapes.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Mitchell
    Such sour grapes.
    You should know....

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    You should know....
    I don't get it.

    errrr....(insert frustrated grumble here).
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

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