Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,908   Posts: 1,521,511   Online: 905
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    craigclu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    NW Wisconsin, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    765
    Do you think there is more sensitivity to areas surrounding and framing the subject? I'm thinking of the right/left brain writings of Betty Edwards and her teaching methods that center on defining the framing area and learning not to zero in on the subject and not work outwards as is one's impulse (especially "shooting" pictures). I struggle with this and admire my more artistic friends for being able to see these things instinctively where I need to constantly stop myself and remember to do this.

    We had a Japanese student stay with us for awhile some years ago and I recall his sensitivity to form. He felt that all of the time as a child, doing things directly with his mother (including origami) gave him an appreciation for spacial concepts and form and are a general part of Japanese culture/expectations. I believe these things form the basis for enhancing technical ability along with a sense of art, beauty, space and form. Re-reading this, I'm not sure I'm expressing my thoughts as clearly as I felt I was thinking about this but we can't write a book here, either!
    Craig Schroeder

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Minnesota Tropics
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    735
    Quote Originally Posted by craigclu
    Do you think there is more sensitivity to areas surrounding and framing the subject?
    You must allow that Japan has had several periods in which certain esthetics changed, and they differ depending upon the medium. For scrolls, the answer is a No. The attention is to the center and presumes a horizontal (time, space) continuum moving left.

    Japanse scrolls are unwound from right to left as the eye takes them in from the same (right to left.) Areas of attention tend to be towards the center. Some details at the top and bottom might be omitted, or left incomplete.

    I'm aware of this because I agonized through Western rationalizations of composition for some time before letting it go, then learned of other cultural rationalizations.

  3. #23
    medform-norm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    863
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I've moved this thread from "Exposure Discussion" to "Photographers."

    "Exposure" is more for things like the Zone System, using a light meter, sunny 16 rule, etc.
    David, you've all the right to do that. But does this move imply that if & when the contributants to this topics suddenly change the direction of this discussion and start translating all our 'cultural musings' back to the practice of exposure and metering light and all that, you'd be prone to move this thread back to where it came from? You'd keep us swaying us back and forth like the wind does with the reeds on a Japanese sumi-e painting.
    Last edited by medform-norm; 07-22-2005 at 02:49 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  4. #24
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,158
    Images
    20
    If the original poster would like to move it back I can do it, but it just doesn't seem to have ever been about that, and I suspect that what we're talking about here isn't really an exposure issue. Will something look more "Japanese" if you meter in one way rather than another?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Minnesota Tropics
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    735
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    If the original poster would like to move it back I can do it, but it just doesn't seem to have ever been about that, and I suspect that what we're talking about here isn't really an exposure issue. Will something look more "Japanese" if you meter in one way rather than another?
    The Japanese metering is best done in ambient mode. It is the light shining upon that matters, not the light that reflects from. oohhhhmmmmmmmmm

  6. #26
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    If the original poster would like to move it back I can do it, but it just doesn't seem to have ever been about that, and I suspect that what we're talking about here isn't really an exposure issue. Will something look more "Japanese" if you meter in one way rather than another?
    Well, I think the discussion grew large enough that a more general category than exposure can be appropriate. Nevertheless, to reiterate the original inquiry, is there something specific in choosing the light that give Japanese photo a specific look? Is there some specific film/paper choice that have an influence as well?

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,158
    Images
    20
    The light perhaps--overcast, shade, soft light.

    Film and paper? Maybe, but I would be surprised if there isn't as much a range used in Japan as there is in North America and Western Europe.

    Lenses--there might be something there. The Japanese collector market tends to drive the prices of certain classic lenses.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin