Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,836   Posts: 1,582,438   Online: 710
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 42
  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,706
    Images
    14
    Hi Jorge

    I believe Ed only makes traditional colour prints, *no digital* he may of changed but all the work I have seen from Ed is done traditionally, which is amazing as TIW is one of Canadas largest digital Labs.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie
    Hi Jorge

    I believe Ed only makes traditional colour prints, *no digital* he may of changed but all the work I have seen from Ed is done traditionally, which is amazing as TIW is one of Canadas largest digital Labs.
    LOL....the irony is hilarious. The owner of one of Canadas largest digital lab refuses to use digital and the one praising his work as digital turns out to be wrong....

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,483
    Images
    20
    Here's a long feature article on Burtynsky from _Toronto Life_ (Feb 2004), with a fine description of his conventional printing process--

    http://www.torontolife.com/magazine/...?listing_id=13

    Quote Originally Posted by Toronto Life, Feb 2004
    I ask to see how a Burtynsky print is made. Unlike much contemporary painting or sculpture, where the individual artist is sole author of every detail, an art photograph today is a collective enterprise, produced somewhat the way a large painting was in a 17th-century European studio. There, under the guidance and vision of the artist, assistants and apprentices would do a lot of the fill-in work. Here, Dan Ebert, Burtynsky’s custom printer, does all of the physical production of Burtynsky’s photographs. I watch Ebert work with an eight-by-10 negative in one of the darkrooms designed for large-format printing (the enlarger is one hefty piece of machinery, equipped with a 2,000-watt bulb, that moves horizontally on tracks). The image is from a series taken at the Carrara marble quarries in Italy. Burtynsky is with us, though Ebert would normally work alone. “After some four years of working together,” Ebert says, “I know what he’s looking for. When he gives me a negative, I can get 90 per cent of the way with it.”

    With the help of charts, the two of them calculate the length of exposure, the lens opening, the distance the enlarger must be from the wall. Then lights out. In the dark, Ebert removes a 50-by-50-inch piece of colour photographic paper from a dispenser, affixes it to the wall, throws the switch. All I see is a vague pattern projected onto white paper, but it obviously means more to Ebert. His hands flutter like moths in the 14.9-second beam of light, shielding parts of the print, allowing others to darken, a technique known as dodging and burning. The paper is then fed into a large processing machine. Five minutes later, a perfectly dry, flat print curls out the other end.

    It looks wonderful to me—a vertiginous glimpse into a white and ochre wound we have inflicted on the earth, a chapter in what I’m beginning to think of as a celebration of loss. But when Burtynsky examines it, this photograph of an Italian marble quarry in use for more than 2,000 years, he suggests that Ebert reduce the exposure by five-tenths of a second and burn in the top left corner a little bit more. He fears that section, mostly rubble, is too bright, will lead the eye astray and off the image. Back to the darkroom, a second round of fluttering hands, a second print. It is almost what he wants, but he suggests that Ebert reduce the exposure by another two-tenths of a second. “The next print,” he says, “will be fine.” When he is satisfied (and with Ebert, it rarely requires more than three attempts), the photograph will then move into the hands of Rose Scheler, a woman with exquisite colour sense. With paint and very fine brushes, she will spot out any small imperfections produced by particles of dust on the lens. Burtynsky will then sign it on the back, write its title and date of printing, and voilà—a Burtynsky print is ready for exhibition.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,706
    Images
    14
    Thanks David

    Though I have made thousands of murals in my life, I would surley love someone describing the process as elequently.

    All I remember from my long days on the horizontal enlarger, is taking the paper off the magnetic wall , gracefully yet skillfully walking in the dark passage to the processors entry port, only to walk into a fr>>> post some idiot put in the middle of the darkhall. Picking myself off the floor ,dazed and confused, to finish my chore.
    Maybe this is why Ed has made millions and I have not, he has protected his head in that most crucial part of printmaking ,*the long dark walk to the processor*

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    Does not Gursky and Struth both produce there large CIBA prints with traditional enalrging methods?

    Anyway, since we seem to have established a provenance of sorts regarding printing, I am curious as to what others think of the images themselves?
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  6. #16
    bjorke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SF & Surrounding Planet
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,032
    Images
    20
    Well I am off to see these prints up close in the next hour or so.

    Thanks Jim for being at least one person on APUG who bothers to write about the pictures.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  7. #17
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    I really like his work. The work doesn't require a digital step to succeed. Although, I can see where machine like precision would enhance the message. I can see why scale is important for the work. To meet the artists grand goal, size can only help or even be needed.

    I could be all wet but…
    I can also see where the message it isn't as grand as the artist states. Sometimes the last person you want to talk to when understanding a peice of art is the artist.

    I may be soaked to the bone, but..
    These are images of mankind's impact or works. There is really a simple truth in these images and they are both beautiful and horrible(?), cold(?), inhuman(?), or godlike(?). I don't know. It is like tasting wine -- one person's hint of pepper may be another’s hint of nut.

    When told you can understand mankind's historical place. I don’t feel the images actually infer this on their own.

    I could be downright pickled but…
    I'm not sure I would consider it "romantically Sublime." My understanding of the term is to mean something is real to the point of terrible (or terribly real) and yet beautiful. Romantic in the classic sense being tragic and or transcendental and sublime being true, perfect and or grand. Winged Victory comes to mind as a classic example.

    In any event, Bjorke thanks for posting. It certainly is interesting work.
    Last edited by mrcallow; 08-06-2005 at 01:57 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Edited - to reflect my ignorance

    *

  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,483
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by bjorke
    Well I am off to see these prints up close in the next hour or so.

    Thanks Jim for being at least one person on APUG who bothers to write about the pictures.
    Let us know what you think of them, for those of us who have only seen the web versions. One can hardly write about the sublime experience of a storm when looking at a snow globe.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #19
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Let us know what you think of them, for those of us who have only seen the web versions. One can hardly write about the sublime experience of a storm when looking at a snow globe.

    Excellent point!

    *

  10. #20
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    I really like the pictures. That all.

    Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin