Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,899   Posts: 1,521,075   Online: 891
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 44
  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,619
    Images
    14
    I have seen quite a few direct comparisons of inkjet and silver B&W prints and IMHO there is absolutely no comparison, the silver print blows away the quadtone, or ultrachrome print. I agree with David , there is the a fascination in seeing a inkjet come out almost as good as a true silver print, but after direct comparing hundreds of prints from the same negatives done both ways the silver optical print always wins out.
    I do believe the reason for this is that scanning to inkjet is second generation and one loses something in the translation, no matter how good the scanner and operator is.
    To be fair , and I do not want to start any flame wars here, but if the original capture is from light phase and then printed through lambda,light jet or chromira. , the quality is much more accurate or close to a straight optical print from negative of the same subject matter.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,231
    Images
    9
    It is too bad but don't beat the guy up. I agree though there is no comparison between the two. We all know that one image is best printed in a certain method. I have images that I think look great in POP but others that I would not even think about doing that way. It could have been the image did look better in that medium.

    I am surprised he said he was switching over entirely.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    I have to agree the ink prints just look flat compared to silver prints. I scan on an Imacon and have printed with eh Epson 7600 Ultrachrome ink set and when I compare the images side by side of the same negative with the same size print the silver analog wins hands down, more depth and richer blacks and whites.

    I have friends that even use drum scans and still say analog prints wins. That is why I went and built a darkroom and only use ink for commercial jobs. For fine art I am mainly only doing traditional now. There is just no comparison.

  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    I think one of the things that drives a lot of digital use is the ease of use (at least for some), many people seem willing to sacrifice quality for ease - perhaps they need more TV time, I don't know. AND, I'm not implying anything about Brooks or his motives, I'm just making a general observation.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15
    ksmattfish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lawrence, KS
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    88
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    I am surprised he said he was switching over entirely.
    This is what surprises me too. I don't understand why people think that using digital methods means giving up film methods entirely. I got tired of explaining the advantages of film, and bought a DSLR for my clients who wanted digital. I still do most of my personal work with BW film and gelatin silver prints. I've been very impressed with digital, but that doesn't mean I've suddenly become unimpressed with traditional film methods. I will continue to study both, and someday hope to even start using pre-film processes. When I read about a dedicated film guy suddenly seeing the light, and going digital, I take that to mean convenience and profit have become the biggest priority.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    Also were his prints ( signed and numebred ) always $20 a print? Or is this with the advant of digital?

    http://shop.lenswork.com/index.asp?P...TS&Category=58

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I get the impression from the article that he has made real comparisons and tested the Epson 4000 with familiar negs that had been printed in other media, silver and otherwise. I did get a sense from the article that there was a fair amount of the "gee-whiz" factor that one experiences the first time you see a pretty nice print come off the printer, not unlike the experience of seeing a print come up in the developer tray for the first time.
    David,
    Not to knitpick, but I was precise in my descriptions. Maureen's print Suspended was clearly better from the inkjet -- many, many others were not even comparable with silver clearly the best medium. My experience and my eye are tellling me that there is no "magic bullet" medium that is best in every case. Some images are best in platinum and any other medium just doesn't do the image justice. Some are best in silver. Some are great in inkjet. We just published Robb Kendrick cowboy portraits in LensWork that are simply superb as tintypes and would not succeed nearly so well in other media. This, to me, is part of the great fun of being a photographer today -- we have so many different ways to show our creative vision! I think this is a big hoorah for photography and look forward to seeing how creative photographers choose to express themselves. Agreed?
    Brooks Jensen
    Editor, LensWork Publishing
    Written Monday August 29, 2005

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Makes it seem like the decision to dismantle the darkroom wasn't really about the availability of imagesetter negs after all. No surprise there, really.
    David,
    I am not sure why there is such insistance that there is a hidden agenda or that there was any reason to discontinue our Special Editions other than what I stated. I can show you the piles of flawed negatives we had to discard that led directly to our decision to shut down the business aspect of the darkroom. As I said in my earlier post, I still have my negatives, my enlarger, and my personal work will likely include some gelatin silver for some time to come. It will also include digital prints. I am not opposed to any medium if it is the best medium for a particular creative vision. I cannot be any clearer than that. So can I ask at least for the benefit of the doubt?
    Brooks Jensen
    Editor, LensWork Publishing
    Written Monday August 29, 2005

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,158
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by lenswork
    David,
    Not to knitpick, but I was precise in my descriptions.

    [...]

    My experience and my eye are tellling me that there is no "magic bullet" medium that is best in every case. Some images are best in platinum and any other medium just doesn't do the image justice. Some are best in silver. Some are great in inkjet.

    [...]

    Agreed?
    Agreed, but let the prints sit for a few years, work in the medium for a while, and I'll be interested in your opinion then. There is a degree of novelty with trying any new process or getting a new machine, and I wonder if your impression is not influenced by that sense of novelty. I don't think you can answer that question right now, but you may be able to at some distance.

    Regarding the Special Editions, I still wonder why not just do traditional dupes with traditional negs instead of imagesetter negs and find a secure way to distinguish them from fine prints to avoid confusing the market, but we've been through that on photo.net.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    154
    I think the benefit and doubt should be yours simply because this thread is out of place. You did not bring your images to an analog site for discussion. someone else did. How you choose to present your work is your choice.
    Your mag speaks for itself still my favorite monthly browse.
    On a personal note though, I'm sorry to see you give up the analog banner. Even if you can make the image more to your vision from a scan, The true achievement would be to go work the image in camera and film till the vision is realized. That type of perseverence would be a great tool of influence passed through the mag.
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin