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  1. #21
    dphphoto's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Kerik] it's easy to spot the photographers in the crowd. They are always way too close to the prints, looking for sharpness/details -

    I used to walk right up to the Ansel Adams prints at Harry Lunn's gallery in D.C, back in the 80's, and look for the spotting, the pinholes. It gave me the sense that he really was human. Not that you couldn't see the humanity from a proper viewing distance.
    I attended a presentation Mann gave in Virginia several years ago. It may be the only time I've been captivated at such an event from beginning to end. Unfortunately, her new work for the most part doesn't move me like the older work did. But it simply may be that I haven't seen the prints live and in person. And I wouldn't dismiss her in the future, there's too good a chance she's going to draw me back in. Dean
    dphphoto

  2. #22
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=dphphoto]
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik
    it's easy to spot the photographers in the crowd. They are always way too close to the prints, looking for sharpness/details -

    I used to walk right up to the Ansel Adams prints at Harry Lunn's gallery in D.C, back in the 80's, and look for the spotting, the pinholes. It gave me the sense that he really was human. Not that you couldn't see the humanity from a proper viewing distance.
    I attended a presentation Mann gave in Virginia several years ago. It may be the only time I've been captivated at such an event from beginning to end. Unfortunately, her new work for the most part doesn't move me like the older work did. But it simply may be that I haven't seen the prints live and in person. And I wouldn't dismiss her in the future, there's too good a chance she's going to draw me back in. Dean
    the plates in 'Deep South' that I am referring to are not ones that require close inspection to see the problem. Imagine a blank white sheet of paper with a few blacks spots around the edges and one small black spot in the middle. This is exactly what a couple of the plates looked like. The subject was entirely obliterated. Why would you include an image like that in an otherwise fine body of work?

  3. #23
    Denis P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laz
    When you get to the gut level and what you like it's hard to argue.

    I do however believe that the more one is educated about art the more a work can at least be appreciated as art even if you do not like it.
    -Bob
    Of course the above is true. However, I felt my rant was too long already to elaborate any further.

    Any meaningful discussion on/of art presumes the parties engaged in such discussion have at least some (common) degree of education in arts.
    Otherwise the evaluation of an artist or of artwork would be a lot easier - whichever sells best is the greatest art/artist - therefore my reference to Kincaide

    As for "notorious", we could mention David Hamilton, couldn't we?

    I remember liking his photos - when I was a lot younger and didn't know any better
    Nowadays they seem more like bad taste...

    Regards,

    Denis

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz
    There's something about this process that is alchemical and soulful. It is really magical working with primitive optics and techniques and being open to serendipitous results. Joe

    Hello, I just want to say that I really like what Joe wrote.

    And I would like to think that all photography can be an alchemical & soulful & serendipitous process, at least that is what I hope for in my work.

    I am not particularly drawn to Mann's work, but I can appreciate both her artistic and photographic talents. It's her prerogative to do her work her way. And this reminds and encourages me to do the same.

    Blessings, Krystyna

  5. #25
    laz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis P.
    I felt my rant was too long already to elaborate any further.
    Rants are never too long!

    As for "notorious", we could mention David Hamilton, couldn't we?
    Yes we could but not in the same breath as Mann. While Hamilton takes pains to characterize his work as "erotica" or "fine art," not "pornography," in practice that simply means that his photographs are blurrier and less explicit than regular pornography. Some of Sally Mann's work has been a provocative exploration of childhood and adolescent sexuality. In Hamilton's work no real attention is paid to the models' identity. Hamilton openly acknowledges that his photos depict their subjects as idealized sexual fantasy objects for men attracted to young girls.

    I would say that people who accuse Mann of pornography are not as offended by what they see in her work as they are by what is reflected back and revealed about themselves.

    -Bob
    [SIZE=1]I want everything Galli has![/SIZE]
    [SIZE=1]I want to make images like Gandolfi![/SIZE]
    rlazell@optonline.net

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