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  1. #11
    medform-norm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky

    You people are sooooo serious.



    Michael
    On the contrary.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by medform-norm
    Happy!

    We just discovered David Plowden through Gorden Coale's great weblog. Now here's an American photographer we can relate to. Nice clean images, great compositions, especially when he's not doing portraits. Here's the link:
    http://www.davidplowden.com

    Anyone share our enthusiasm?
    These look great. As my wife would say "you can see everything on these photos." You will gather from this that she feels my prints have too much contrast and I sacrifice light and tones to get a "punchy" print. I do and fail to achieve either. The light and the tones are tremendous. I must try Pan F again.

    Pentaxuser

  3. #13
    Bill Hahn's Avatar
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    David Plowden DVD

    You can buy a DVD about David Plowden here:

    http://www.wgvu.org/store/

    It's quite good. I have two of his books, "The American Barn" (which he was doing at the time of the movie) and "End of An Era", the latter being about
    the ore boats on the Great Lakes.
    "I bought a new camera. It's so advanced you don't even need it." - Steven Wright

  4. #14

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    [QUOTE=blansky]Too much liberal use of gray.

    Much of what Plowden photographs IS gray -- that's why it is so difficult, and rare to find a photographer who can do it at all, much less superbly.

  5. #15

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    Far and away my favorite photographer. For years I never realized other folks phographed steel mills and bridges (I'm a structural engineer). And then I found a Plowden book . . . and then Bernd & Hilla Becher . . . and on and on. But Plowden's photos are what I had always been trying, and mostly failing, to make my photos look like.

  6. #16
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    This scene is still intact much as it was in 1968: http://www.davidplowden.com/photogra...ndustry&img=20
    That area has been on my "to shoot" list for about a year. I see Plowden beat me there by nearly 40 years.

    This is one where I want to set up in the same location to see how its changed: http://www.davidplowden.com/photogra...%20Towns&img=2
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  7. #17
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    I don't know what "relate to" means...
    I find this utterly boring, but thats me.. never been to America, thus I can't see the spetacular in these images.
    (not speaking of his technical merits..)

  8. #18

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    I remember going through a phase of self-doubt about my own photography after picking up a book of his work about 12 years ago and realizing he had already covered a lot of the subject matter I shoot. That is when I realized that everything or every idea has been photographed already and one just has to forget about others and just work with what you enjoy.

    Most of his work has a great resonance for me because the rural images are where I grew up. I don't expect someone from overseas or the east coast to understand an area like the Great Plains and its appeal and hold on some people. I also can relate to many of the industrial pictures. As a kid when we went on vacation we were always side tracking and then being suprised when we would pull up to a factory or dam or mine that my dad had called ahead of time and arranged a tour for us.

    They have a couple of his prints at the University of Nebraska museum and all I can say is they are much better in person then they reproduce on a web site.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  9. #19
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Those are formidably precise negative exposures and development, which then led to equally precise prints!

    Would LOVE to see the real thing!!

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  10. #20
    Marv's Avatar
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    The real thing is worth the effort, Murray.

    I happen upon a traveling exhibit of prints from "A Sense of Place" a few years back. They were 11X14 to 16X 20's taken in Iowa, away from the rivers.

    Farms, grain elevators, small town stores, rural midwest scenes, before the "industrialization" of the family farm. Simple on the surface, but very complex once you take the time to really look at them.

    End of an Era, on the other hand, is made up of bold images that need to be viewed for thier complexity.

    He is very talented and has a fantastic eye.

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