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  1. #11

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    If you want to see some amazing prints done by himself although I don't know if he does his own enlarged negs but the platnum work by Albert Watson is startling. deep saturated big beautiful prints.
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    t to some, that is like da Vinci telling his assistant how he wanted the Mona Lisa painted.
    Michael
    Sorry, but this analogy does not work at all.
    Excepted for those of course who believe phtography = printing.
    bertram
    A la recherche du temps perdu: www. bersac.de

  3. #13

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    Marpelthorpe was, I believe, a marvelous photographer. I particularly like his color work. Truth to be told I would imagine the great majority of the members a APUG would benefit from having our work printed by the best printers around. I also believe, certainly in my own case, that we would have less satisfaction or sense of ownership by having others print our negatives. We would also have far less funds. Printing your own work, it seems to me, to be integral with the learning process. There is no better way to realize the deficiencies of our negatives than by learning to print but I am sure there are few of us that do it with such regularity as to become first rate at printing.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  4. #14

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    Mapplethorpe is an interesting subject. While I think he was an above average phtographer as far as his technical skill and use of lighting, I wonder if anyone would care about any of his work if not for his homo-erotic images and his relationship with art critique and curator Sam Wagstaff. This certainly would have opened many doors for him in the rarified air of the NYC art scene. His tragic, early death also elevated the status of his work, as death does for the work of most well known artists in their prime.

    However, as is the case with any art, subject matter and the courage, ability, vision of the artist to bring it to light often is more important then any technical ability.

    With regards to other printing his work, this is by no means unusual. One parallel in the art world is sculpture. Artists who work with massive pieces such as Richard Serra and David Smith design the work but have others do the construction and installation. Pop artists like Jeff Koons have whole legions of staff to actually make the pieces and Sol Lewitt also provides designs for others to complete.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfshootist
    Sorry, but this analogy does not work at all.
    Excepted for those of course who believe phtography = printing.
    bertram
    It depends on your point of view. If one believes that photography is an art then one might wish that the photographer was the sole participant in the production from concept through to the production of the print.

    If one accepts that it is a collaborative process between assistants, art directors, and printers then we start to get to the point where we are giving the photographer far too much credit for the work.

    As I said it is a sticky problem. It starts to get towards the Thomas Kinkade(sp?)/Jeff Koons situation where the artist oversees, sort of. Hardly the hands on concept that the public may think they are buying.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #16

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    Elliott Erwitt once said he didn't respect any photographer who wouldn't process his own film. I'm not sure how that went over with Henri Cartier-Bresson and other members of Magnum (an agency Erwitt headed for a period) who used lab people to handle the darkroom work.

    My personal thoughts are that a photographer's photographs should be his own photographs. If he is not able to print them himself, he should at least be present and oversee the procedures. I would bet most photographers use others to process their film and print their work when they reach a level of popularity and can't keep up with the workload. Paul Strand and Walker Evans did it, I know, and Erwitt eventually did it himself.

  7. #17

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    Just a note. When discussing Mapplethorpe, it might be a nice idea to mention which one, especially when you mention the fact that he's now dead. Yes, Robert Mapplethorpe is dead, but Edward is alive and well and still photographing...

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    Avedon had lab people doing his work. It can be argued that they oversaw the process but to some, that is like da Vinci telling his assistant how he wanted the Mona Lisa painted.
    Many of the famous painter's like Rembrandt, when doing portraits, would merely paint the subject's face and then have assistants do the clothing and background. You must remember that they were not considered artists, the concept did not exist in their time, but merely as artisans.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Marpelthorpe was, I believe, a marvelous photographer. I particularly like his color work.
    Me too. Robert Mapplethorpe's dye transfer work may be the best color printing I've ever seen, no matter who actually printed it.

    I don't find his controversial b&w work in the least bit erotic, but those color still lifes are really something.

  10. #20

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    Mapplethorpe never misrepresented his work as being printed by himself, so no problem IMO. If he hadn't been there none of those images would of been created.

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