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  1. #21
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    George thanks for the Woodman link, that is a new one for me....

    Mike, to your request,

    an interesting and "unknown photographer" Frank Sadorous of Sadorus Illinois...see his book "Upon a quiet Landscape" The Photographs of Frank Sadorus...from 350 wet plates...the photographs are from 1908 - 1912. Frank was totally out of touch with other photographers of his time. He referred to himself as Frank Sadorous, Lifeographist, and Sadorous Artistic Pictorialist, and the "Sadorous Sunshine System"... his photographs are incredibly humorous and he exhibits a great deal of expertise, double exposure etc...also a good documentary of life on the farm and the removing of wooded landscape etc...Self taught, his materials came by mail and his plates came from the "St. Louis Seed Dry Plate Company...used Velox paper...

    "under obscure circumstances" on March 22, 1917, Frank was committed to a mental hospital in Kankakee, Ilinois...Frank is "troubled with delusions and hallucinations with a pronounced tendency to worry." In his medical records, under mental disposition the physician wrote "kind."

    He was in that hospital for the next 17 years and died on Christmas day, 1934.

  2. #22
    Bill Hahn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cao
    While W. Eugene Smith's pictures have an extra helping of amazing, he seems to have had an extra helping of messed up.
    "I wouldn't envy the psychiatrist who had to analyze Gene." - Ed Thompson,
    Photo Editor for LIFE magazine (quoted in the video: "W. Eugene Smith: Photography
    Made Difficult").

    "I said I want that fellow who did that essay about the Spanish village...Ed Thompson, he says to me, 'You want Smith? I'm telling you now, it would be easier just to buy a revolver and shoot yourself.' " Stephan Lorant, who hired Smith to make a dozen photographs of Pittsburgh. Lorant figured it would take two weeks. Smith stayed for months and made over 11,000 photos....Lorant wound up suing Smith, I believe.

    Read Russell Miller's book on Magnum, there is a chapter entitled: "The Saga of W. Eugene Smith". He became such a money sink that they eventually parted company.

    But what a photographer!
    "I bought a new camera. It's so advanced you don't even need it." - Steven Wright

  3. #23
    arigram's Avatar
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    This thread is depressing.

    (and yes, I suffer from depression fifteen years now)

    I use photography as a means to approach people and deal with the love-hate relationship I have with them
    Artists are often depressive because they are overly sensitive, appear different to other people and thus treated as such, have strong and often idealistic ideas about the world which do not apply in reality, work alone, their work is deeply personal and so its progress affects them directly, and many other things.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  4. #24
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne
    Times have changed, but psychiatry has changed very little. They are just as full of shit as ever.
    I happen to be a psychiatrist. Thanks, Wayne, for your vote of confidence. I'll send you a Scientology T-shirt.

    Depression is common. Maybe 1 in 10 to 1 in 15 people experience an episode of major depression in a lifetime. So one would expect the same in artistically minded people. Bipolar disorder, of which depression is a component, is probably over-represented in artistic people.

    A psychologist, Kay Redfield-Jamison (who happens to have bipolar disorder) has done alot of reading and researh on bipolar disorder. She gives alot of talks on "Creativity and Madness." One book that might be of interest: Touched With Fire
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #25

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    The first thing our psychiatrist does is try to "brand" me as a Scientologist in an ad hominem attack to discredit what I say, while in fact nothing could be futher from the truth. You'll have to do better than that, I've seen it a hundred times.

    I'm sure Kay is a wonderful person and I'm sincerely happy that she has found something that helps. But she unfortunately reiterates the same nonsense masqueraded as science that we are all bombarded with in the media everyday. Having good intentions and/or having suffered from depression or other mental illness does not make one immune to the lies that psychiatry perpetrates on the public. If anything it makes a person more susceptible, because they are vulnerable and want to believe so bad.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne
    Times have changed, but psychiatry has changed very little. They are just as full of shit as ever.
    Sounds like you could use one.

  7. #27
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne
    The first thing our psychiatrist does is try to "brand" me as a Scientologist in an ad hominem attack to discredit what I say, while in fact nothing could be futher from the truth. You'll have to do better than that, I've seen it a hundred times.

    I'm sure Kay is a wonderful person and I'm sincerely happy that she has found something that helps. But she unfortunately reiterates the same nonsense masqueraded as science that we are all bombarded with in the media everyday. Having good intentions and/or having suffered from depression or other mental illness does not make one immune to the lies that psychiatry perpetrates on the public. If anything it makes a person more susceptible, because they are vulnerable and want to believe so bad.
    I was trying to joke around. Sorry for the offense.

    Not to hijack the thread, but what are all these lies and nonsense with which you find yourself bombarded?
    Jerold Harter MD

  8. #28
    athanasius80's Avatar
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    I bet that Josef Sudek had episodes of depression. After all, he lost his arm in the Great War.

    Henry Rollins once said something to the effect that, "You're never more righteous then right after you're dumped," and I think that depression can be most artistically inspiring. It can also destroy you. But I think Beethoven and Van Gogh would be infinitely less if they were just happy people making happy art.

  9. #29
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter
    Depression is common. Maybe 1 in 10 to 1 in 15 people experience an episode of major depression in a lifetime. So one would expect the same in artistically minded people. Bipolar disorder, of which depression is a component, is probably over-represented in artistic people.
    Interesting observation. As I get older (almost 51) I can see that my life has gone through various periods, some up and some down, particularly when I was around 45. I don't know much about the field of psychiatry, but I am an avid reader and have read a number of books dealing with interpersonal relationships; from what I have read, I don't know how anyone can say the field of psychiatry hasn't changed.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #30
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter
    I happen to be a psychiatrist. Thanks, Wayne, for your vote of confidence. I'll send you a Scientology T-shirt.

    Depression is common. Maybe 1 in 10 to 1 in 15 people experience an episode of major depression in a lifetime. So one would expect the same in artistically minded people. Bipolar disorder, of which depression is a component, is probably over-represented in artistic people.

    A psychologist, Kay Redfield-Jamison (who happens to have bipolar disorder) has done alot of reading and researh on bipolar disorder. She gives alot of talks on "Creativity and Madness." One book that might be of interest: Touched With Fire
    That's funny.

    Seriously, I had a major depression episode which was diagnosed as 'clinical' I was given drugs to pop me out of it. It sorta worked. Turns out my problem was related to the fact that my job changed and I went from 100 hours a week to 40 a week suddenly. After a year+ of no free time, I felt I had too much free time and was feeling guilty about doing nothing with the time.

    My photography during that time was interesting. I made a lot of pictures with an 'isolation' theme. My prints were made with low values. Almost all of them were way too heavy. It takes a pretty bright light source to bring out any good detail.

    I was looking at several Paul Strand photographs on Saturday night. These photographs are currently on display at the Tacoma Art Museum. They were all heavily printed as well. If I have my dates right, the photographs were made later in his career. I had the impression that they were much like my own... only a hell of a lot better!

    I found that rigourous physical exercise (bicycle racing and training) nicely took the place of the anti-depressant drugs I was on. I figure that I was working so hard in my free time that I no longer needed to feel guilty about doing nothing... that and the chemical changes in the brain brought on by the exercise.

    My prints today are lively. They are also about 90 percent 'people photographs' Most are sports but some are just pleasant portraits. Oh, and I have no symptoms of depression.
    Last edited by SchwinnParamount; 02-06-2006 at 06:28 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I was unclear



 

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