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  1. #11
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    As a professional, this person should have known his equipment well enough to pay attention to the CLIENT.
    Keeping up with the flow is an important part of being an event photographer.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  2. #12
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    You know, it is possible on most professional DSRLs to turn the LCD off.
    Being able to verify the shots while still on site is one of the reasons I keep hearing for shooting events digitally. The real pros only do this during a 'break' in the action.

    As a contrast, Saturday I attended a wedding that was covered by a real pro. He wa unobtrusive, yet took a lot of pictures. He handled and posed the people well for group shots, and only 'reviewed' his work in a quiet corner during a break. There was a teenager there with his own DSLR who aspires to become a professional photographer and approached him. The pro treated him cordially, encouraged him and let him assist with lighting on a few shots. The kid was on cloud nine. What a breath of fresh air!

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  3. #13
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    The digi-cams get obsolete so fast no one actually learns how to work them before the next - better model gets handed to them.

    My daughter was walking with 1300 other grads at UNR this Saturday past. It was a cluster ($%@! Sorry, no more accurate descriptor. When she was within the next 20 or so I made my way down to the fence with my trusty camera to get my shot. A guy on the other side of the fence was being abusive to the dad's and mom's that had paid a jillion $$$ for their kids chance at life. There were about 40 other parents trying to do the same thing. 2 fat lady's got up and slowly moved their large a$$e$ in front of me. Sometime in the confusion my daughter received her diploma and I missed the whole %&&+^)(*& thing.

    So I guess I'll be trying to buy a photo from the "professional".
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP
    I think it is human nature to immediately look at the results of something when that is possible. But one would expect a pro to be better disciplined with such a simple shot.
    I don't think it's necessarily human nature. Perhaps self-doubt, conditioning, or something else. I've used a digital while doing volunteer work for an area park district and nothing was easier than keeping that screen turned off. I set up the shot, snapped the picture and went on to setting up the next shot. It's entirely on the photographer if they are doubting their abilities so much that they have to keep checking to make sure they got the shot.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDynamo
    hunch over that tiny little screen before the guests start getting there. or you can put down the point and shoot and stop calling yourself a professional.
    Darn right. I am no pro nor do I pretend to be. I just am smart enough to know that when you are hired for a job, you get to the church/building/whatever before hand and run some tests. Of course if I was doing a job like that, the ONLY thing I would use is print film, preferably one with a really good exposure latitude so just in case I screw up and overexpose by a stop, a good lab can fix it.

    Not that I've ever left my meter bracket to +/- 1 or 2 stops without realizing it before; oh no, not me.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopaka
    As a contrast, Saturday I attended a wedding that was covered by a real pro. He wa unobtrusive, yet took a lot of pictures. He handled and posed the people well for group shots, and only 'reviewed' his work in a quiet corner during a break. There was a teenager there with his own DSLR who aspires to become a professional photographer and approached him. The pro treated him cordially, encouraged him and let him assist with lighting on a few shots. The kid was on cloud nine. What a breath of fresh air!
    That's great! One of the things about photography I love is how so many of us, especially some of us here on APUG, are so generous about teaching others. This summer I am teaching my sister about black and white photography and how to develop her own film. Plus I'm the Vice President of my Photography club on campus and it's so much fun showing kids cameras that are 50 years old and take great shots.

    Whether you learn on a Canon/Nikon DSLR or an Agfa Isolette or whatever, so long as you learn the basics and have fun doing it. One of the best ways to enjoy something is to share it.

  7. #17
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopaka
    As a contrast, Saturday I attended a wedding that was covered by a real pro. He wa unobtrusive, yet took a lot of pictures. He handled and posed the people well for group shots, and only 'reviewed' his work in a quiet corner during a break. There was a teenager there with his own DSLR who aspires to become a professional photographer and approached him. The pro treated him cordially, encouraged him and let him assist with lighting on a few shots. The kid was on cloud nine. What a breath of fresh air!

    Bob
    Two weekends ago I was at a wedding being shot by two photographers with DSLRs. The lead said he missed using his Bronicas, but really had to go digital from a workflow perspective. He only looked at the screen when there was a break or to show the couple a shot. And he invited me to join him, including offering me a spare radio slave for the reception.

    His digital excuse held up well, the proofs were posted to his website Monday, from a Saturday wedding. Pretty good work, too.

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