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  1. #61
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    For those familiar with Edward Hopper, the image reminds me quite a bit of some of his paintings.
    Yes. Cool connection.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  2. #62
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    Yes. Cool connection.
    Though a departure in topic, there probably are numerous instances of similarities in painting and photography.

    The one that comes most to mind would be between Moran and William Henry Jackson that worked closely together for the Yellowstone Expedition and aided in the the creation of Yellowstone National Park. My understanding is that they worked fairly closely together relying on each others work.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  3. #63
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb
    I believe Mr. White saw and knew exactly what he was placing on the film sheet...
    I'm another that also believes that. The careful framing, the sense of light.

    One of Minor White's concepts was 'backwards visualization' by the viewer towards the photographer's state of mind at the time of exposure. Viewers are able to make that connection backwards and have the thought 'This is what MW saw, and I can see why it is exactly the way it is'.

    Best,
    Helen

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley

    Special hidden meanings? I don't think so. Just a good scene that has strong elements for a good B&W photo. I think all this stuff about hidden messages is just something art professors tell their students.
    Don't forget thouugh Minor White was that art professor and liked to have people photograph "what else the subject was"
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley

    Special hidden meanings? I don't think so. Just a good scene that has strong elements for a good B&W photo. I think all this stuff about hidden messages is just something art professors tell their students.
    The point is, though, they're not really hidden. They're something you can get a gut feeling about pretty quickly.

    You don't really have to verbalise too much, certainly not to over-intellectualise, here (though we have to do that to some extent to talk to each other about it) - you can get the messages (if there are messages) on quite a subliminal level, without really trying.

    I like the idea of working backwards to where the photographer was at - maybe that's just another way of saying take a bit of time - maybe give the picture a chance to work its magic - and don't jump in immediately with your own judgements, assumptions, and viewpoint. Try to get on the track the photographer was on.

    Cate

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    I'm another that also believes that. The careful framing, the sense of light.

    One of Minor White's concepts was 'backwards visualization' by the viewer towards the photographer's state of mind at the time of exposure. Viewers are able to make that connection backwards and have the thought 'This is what MW saw, and I can see why it is exactly the way it is'.

    Best,
    Helen
    I agree with you Helen. I think he knew exactly what he wanted to say and us to see. I like his work immensely , especially the Abstracts.

    I like this image because it is a static subjuct but very much alive. Your eye (or mine atleast) constantly wanderers around the scene especially along the telegraph pole shadow. I find it masterful and a very fulfilling image.

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  7. #67

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    Early in this thread I said that I found this Minor White photo boring. I said that it was easy for him.

    After all the comments and a more careful sight of the image, a second thought, I still think that it was easy for him, an easy Zen shot. Like in "Zen and The Art of Archery". When the target, the arrow, the arch and the archer are one, then the shoot is in the bull eye.

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose A Martinez
    Early in this thread I said that I found this Minor White photo boring. I said that it was easy for him.

    After all the comments and a more careful sight of the image, a second thought, I still think that it was easy for him, an easy Zen shot. Like in "Zen and The Art of Archery". When the target, the arrow, the arch and the archer are one, then the shoot is in the bull eye.

    Jose

    I beleive he had the mastery of the tools and process at his disposal, which allowed him to get the bulls-eyes. He definitely had an eye for good composition and sometimes looking outside the box.

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

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