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  1. #21

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    The works of Lewis Baltz had a strong impact on me when I saw his book San Quentin Point in 1987, then I attended an exhibithion, Dialectical Landscape, he had with others US photographers (S. Shore, R Adams, W Eggleston) in Venice the same year. The prints were really interesting and they rappresented very well the subjects of the Baltz work.
    I like mostly his works of the end of 70 and the 80:
    - Nevada Portofolio edited by Castelli Graphic 1978
    - Park City edited by Artspace Press 1980
    - San Quentin Point edited by Aperture 1986
    - Candlestick Point edited by Aperture 1989
    These books could be improved with Near Reno a portfolio never edited but often exhibithed and Park near Irvine recently re-edited.
    L. Baltz has the rigorous method of vision and the clear purpose to transfer the anathomy of (altered) lanscape in photography of any other "topographic photographer".
    Perhaps his photos could be too harsh for a long vision, but he was one of the most innovative photographer in the last twenty years.

  2. #22
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky
    It's more the concepts than the prints that I care about. But I do remember reading somewhere back in the early 80s something about his technique. It was really weird. I think he shoots everything on 35mm Tri-X, but developed in something really ODD - like dektol or technidol (yes, i knooowwww those are REALLY different - but it was something just a weird - perhaps it was lith developer...). Does anyone know?
    Hi Sparky,

    Well, according to his excellent essay in Landscape: Theory, published in 1980, the Park City work was shot on 'Kodak High-Contrast Copy Film' (sic) and developed in Perfection Micrograin. The word at the time was that he used TP but, though we had mutual acquaintances, I never met him so never heard it from the horse's mouth. He printed on grade 3 Brovira and developed in Dektol. Two-bath fixing, then selenium toning for archival stability.

    The essay also mentions the selection of a tripod-mounted eye-level 35 mm camera with a 35 mm lens stopped down to give deep focus.

    I've just re-read the essay (A good start to the day) to extract those technical titbits, but I've run out of time to write more now. I don't have much of his work here in NY, most is still in London.

    Best,
    Helen

  3. #23

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    John, hi, just back in Hong Kong, was in Iceland when I replyed earlier. The show I saw was at the Sargent Gallery about 3 years back. Was very good. As to the master class, I am thinking very seriously about it. I will be back in NZ at the time as I have a show opening in Wellington just before that. You going to take the class?

    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    Hi David, glad you saw the thread. Yes the influence on Wayne Barrar is pretty evident isn't it. I've wondered about Mark Adams perhaps also...

    Guess you're talking about McNamara's in Wanganui?

    Actually you may be interested; Baltz will be showing an exhibition and holding a 'master class' in Auckland with Harvey Benge at the end of the year. Would be good if you were in town!
    Thanks for the tip on Unity Books.

    Cheers John.

    Argus. I'm afraid to say he wasn't the only one either!
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    Hi Sparky,

    Well, according to his excellent essay in Landscape: Theory, published in 1980, the Park City work was shot on 'Kodak High-Contrast Copy Film' (sic) and developed in Perfection Micrograin.
    Hmmm... interesting. I think it MIGHT have been Landscape: Theory I read about him and his process in at one point. But I'm sure it was at LEAST 20 years ago!! (ACK!!) Coulda sworn it was Tri-X since I had the impression it was a really crude way to capture seemingly 'delicate' graphic linework that would be better suited to something slower... but hell, it was 20 years ago... so what do I know? I'll sure have to take your word for it. It would certainly explain the tonality.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky
    Hmmm... interesting. I think it MIGHT have been Landscape: Theory I read about him and his process in at one point. But I'm sure it was at LEAST 20 years ago!! (ACK!!) Coulda sworn it was Tri-X since I had the impression it was a really crude way to capture seemingly 'delicate' graphic linework that would be better suited to something slower... but hell, it was 20 years ago... so what do I know? I'll sure have to take your word for it. It would certainly explain the tonality.
    Back in the late 80's I attended a workshop given by Lewis Baltz here in the UK. He discussed the San Quintin project & book, & we were fortunate to see a selection of prints, which I remember as being very soft. At the time he was using a Linhof camera with 120 backs, but I can't remeber what film he was using, but he was about to start using 120 Kodachrome.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by livemoa
    John, hi, just back in Hong Kong, was in Iceland when I replyed earlier. The show I saw was at the Sargent Gallery about 3 years back. Was very good. As to the master class, I am thinking very seriously about it. I will be back in NZ at the time as I have a show opening in Wellington just before that. You going to take the class?
    Hi David, had been considering attending but will have quite a lot on at that time so not able to commit, just yet. Will pm you the details.

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