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  1. #41
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel_OB View Post
    As I know mayority of professional wild life pictures today are made in zoo or botanic garden and "adjusted" accordingly by computer to sell. Magazines do not care where it is made but rather can they make money on the same. He probably realized that zoo is more convinient than wilderness. Otherwise who is so stupid to take digital camera battery+..+.. depend into some dangerous places, for they are not enough reliable. Hex, you really have to open eyes today when some picture is in question.

    www.Leica-R.com
    I am not sure what percentage of wildlife and animal photos are in captive settings for sale and for publication. Unless things have changed, those of us selling stock images of animals (myself included) were/have always been paid based upon whether the image was of a wild or captive animal. Of course, wild animals would also apply to those taken in National Parks and National Wildlife Refuges.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  2. #42
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    I always would have figured Digital cameras would be a little too delicate for wildlife work, dropping a $10,0000 camera in a lake while trying to get a look at a hippo sounds like a bad move. That and the constant need for electricity on location, seems like more trouble than it's worth. But to each his own I guess, I quite liked a few of his photos, name sorta rings a bell...
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  3. #43
    Ole
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    When I organised the LF gathering in Norway last year, I was asked if LF with scanning back was welcome.

    The answer was simple: "Yes, but you'll have to bring your own 5 km extension cord".
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #44
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    When I organised the LF gathering in Norway last year, I was asked if LF with scanning back was welcome.

    The answer was simple: "Yes, but you'll have to bring your own 5 km extension cord".
    Ole,

    They don't need such a long extension cord, only extra batteries, inverter, and/or solar cells. :o

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  5. #45
    Ole
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    Yes Rich - but the extra batteries, inverter, PC, et cetera would be a lot more difficult to bring to some of the places we were going. And solar cells tend not to be too much use at the bottom of a 1800m "valley" - more like a canyon, really.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #46
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    Yes Rich - but the extra batteries, inverter, PC, et cetera would be a lot more difficult to bring to some of the places we were going. And solar cells tend not to be too much use at the bottom of a 1800m "valley" - more like a canyon, really.
    Hi Ole,

    I do realize that. I was just poking a little fun at the problems for shooting in the field without mentioning the computer (and batteries) to be tethered to the digital back for the 4 X 5. I tell people at the Art Shows in which I participate all the time that I will continue to use film because of the alarming costs involved ($16,000 to $30,000), being tethered to the the computer, the need for new wide angle lenses (since the sensor is less than 4 X 5), and the approximately 20 lbs added to my already 25 - 45 or more lb pack.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleath View Post
    I always would have figured Digital cameras would be a little too delicate for wildlife work, dropping a $10,0000 camera in a lake while trying to get a look at a hippo sounds like a bad move. That and the constant need for electricity on location, seems like more trouble than it's worth. But to each his own I guess, I quite liked a few of his photos, name sorta rings a bell...

    Truth is, good quality(rugged and weatherproof) digital cameras dosn`t cost $10K anymore, you can get up to 2000 images on a single battery, you`re not so electricity dependant anymore, and I guess he can travel with lots of spare batteries and portable HD`s.. Good for him...

    But that doesn`t make me want to go digital for my work. No way.
    I do own a DSLR, but it`s not used for anything but making snaps of stuff I`ve been selling..
    Amund
    __________________________________________
    -Digital is nice but film is like having sex with light-

  8. #48
    RAP
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    I wonder if he considered such things as longevity of his digital files as this article will bring out;

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...-home-business

    If the link is expired, here is a clip;
    Unable to Repeat the Past
    Storing information is easier than ever, but it's also never been so easy to lose it -- forever. We could end up with a modern history gap.
    By Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
    September 13, 2006

    Digital records from government archives to baby pictures are disappearing due to glitches in digital storage methods. Computer disks and tapes can be destroyed by heat and humidity in less than a year. Personal documents and images are lost every day when hard drives crash. Much of the digital tape used to record NASA space flight data from the 1960s and 1970s has degraded beyond recovery. "If we don't solve the problem," said Kenneth Thibodaux of the National Archives, "our time will not become part of the past." (Los Angeles Times, free registration required)


    It was posted on a thread that Sean closed.

    Anyway the integrity of digital files should be of concern for those who are considering making the change.

    Also, with the billions of dollars that these tech companies have that are pushing digital, I wonder if he and others were approached by any one of them and offered a buy out, incentive fee for making the change, money plus equipment. A famous photographer doing so is a big endorsement for digital companies. It gives the impression to the rest of us, especially younger ones, that digital is the only way to break into professional photography.

    Given the control and essentially, the monopoly that stock houses have, Corbis/Microsoft/Gates, they can pretty much dictate the market. It seems these companies, the Getty's and Corbis' are buying up all the analog collections they can get their hands on and digitizing them.

    Essentially forcing the rest of us to go digital or give up photography all together.
    Time & tides wait for no one, especially photographers.

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