Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 72,423   Posts: 1,596,740   Online: 822
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    david b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    None of your business
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,031
    Images
    30
    Have a look at Michael Levin, Josef Hoflehner, Rolfe Horn, David Burdeny and Denis Olivier

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    852
    Images
    10
    This style of photography is very common, thematic content is restricted and common across many photographers and pictures are almost interchangeable. Content usually contains two elements -- a long tonal transition usually from top to bottom and an object anchor. Tonal transition is often sea at top half and land at bottom half, object anchor often a wharf, jetty, stone in low-water foreground, post or posts etc. Tonal transition is usually very smooth, glassy water through horizon line through sky. Tonal range is often compressed, emphasizing deep greys and blacks for dramatic effect. Very important is square frame, rule-of-thirds composition. Yes I dismiss these, they're just not interesting but can be aesthetically pleasant and when well-printed no doubt graphically good.

  3. #13
    patrickjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    743
    There is a big group of photographers that does these types of images now. It is becoming a cliché. Most of these photographers manipulate images in the computer and as a result they become sterile in my opinion. The only photographer that stands out to me that has a style similar to those mentioned above is Bill Schwab. His images have a strong soul and a depth that is lacking in many of the others. I have some strong opinions about many of the photographers mentioned above, but I will have to keep them to myself.

    Patrick

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    464
    Images
    6
    I have and use a 10 stop Neutral Density filter, at times in conjunction with a polarizing filter. This makes for long exposures during mid-day, at times on the order of 20-45 minutes when taking into account reciprocity characteristics of the film.

    It can be an interesting way of cleaning a scene of people, animals and other transitory objects. It can give a nice feeling to an image and need not be a 'formula' photo as described by one poster.

    In B&W it is nice and in color can give you a different world.

    Solid camera/tripod combination is nice to have but even if moving a touch in the breeze as long as it comes to rest in the same position movement isn't much to worry about on a 20 minute exposure. Not unless the camera rocks the whole time and then maybe the image would be interesting enough to warrant printing.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin