Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,475   Posts: 1,542,619   Online: 986
      
Page 5 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 110
  1. #41

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    651
    Through Another Lens is also a great book. Anything that Charis wrote is wonderful. By the late thirties she was writing wrote all of the articles that carry Weston's signature. His ideas and thoughts, of course.

    I'm no longer obsessed with Weston, Ed. I just happen to have all of his books--something started a long time ago, and it seems easier to continue than to stop.

    I'm curious, Ed, who you think is Weston's equal among twentieth century photographers. There are a few that come to mind to me, though they worked in a different mode. I think Weston was certainly the preeminent modernist. Although a good case can be made for Brett. It is little known that Brett was a major influence on Edward. Brett came of age as a photographer just as Edward was entering his high-modernist period. It was Brett who first photographed at Point Lobos and discovered what has come to be called Weston Beach. And it was Brett was first photographed the sand dunes at Oceano. Brett's contribution has been overlooked. We hope to remedy that with our nineteen-volume set of his portfolios. Most of the work in them has never been reproduced before. First one, "San Francisco" should be out by April.

  2. #42

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Jasper, Tennessee
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    73
    Although I think that Edward Weston was one of the greatest photographers of our time, what really draws me to the Daybooks, and other books about Weston, was his complete dedication to photography. Wheither you like his work or not, wheither you would like him as a person or not, there is something about someone who dedicates their life to photography, to the exclusion of nearly everything else, that draws us to them.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Düsseldorf, Germany
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,021
    Images
    1
    I apologise right now to EW fans BUT I just have to say that I cannot separate the person from the artist. It is one thing to completely dedicate oneself to photography it is another to do so at the expense of the family you fathered. I love his work but not what he did to achieve it. I have a son and will gladly throw away every piece of equipment I own to make him happier. To leave him to pursue my artistic calling would be suicide. The fact that EW was able to do so shows how shallow his value system was. He is a great artist no doubt but is that really enough. For me it is not.

    I feel that in life we must strike a balance between our selfish reflexes and our responsibilities to our family and friends. The ends does not justify the means.
    Francesco

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,576
    Images
    27
    Franseco, interesting point - I do not disagree, but I think AA is held with more respect in some ways than EW, but in many ways he was like EW when it came to his family - at least from what I have read. I wonder if the same is true for others of that era, such a Dorothea Lange, Elliot Porter, Ernest Knee, Imogen Cunningham, Paul Strand, Minor White and many others...these artist do not share the fame of EW or AA, yet there work in my mind is just as important. What EW and AA did was bring photography to the general public - without them photography would not be the same today, but the cost to their families was probably higher than any of us would be willing to pay.

    Justified, they could only answer the question - I can not pass judgement or cast a stone....we all live our lives the best we can and do our best with our families and our hobbies.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  5. #45

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Düsseldorf, Germany
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,021
    Images
    1
    Thank you Mike. I do try to separate the man from the artist but every since my son was born I realise that certain things just cannot be separated from him. I am no longer a photographer but a father who likes to take pictures now and then. Unfortunately for me I feel that artists are more than just the result of their body of work.
    Francesco

  6. #46
    lee
    lee is offline
    lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth TX
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,913
    Images
    8
    Edward's sons did live with him and he took them on trips. It is not as if he abandoned them. Their mother and Edward were the ones with the problems not Edward and his sons. Cole was the one that learned to print his father's negs and Brett was a photographer in his own right. The other son slips my memory right now. He may not have won any "Father of the Year" awards but he was not evil.

    lee\c

  7. #47
    bmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    2,156
    Images
    9
    I'm with you Francesco!
    hi!

  8. #48

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Jasper, Tennessee
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    73
    I certainly agree that Edward Weston wasn't anyones idea of Father of the Year but he wasn't the uncareing, disintereted father that some people have made him out to be:

    Daybooks: October 29:

    "...Brett's net swishing through the ari, butterflies captive in its meshes or sailing away to his chagrin. This was our day togeather in Tlalpan, a happy day for both, though my joy was most in seeing his!"

  9. #49

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    651
    You have it dead wrong Francesco. Edward and his sons were very close. HIs sons ordered their adult lives to be near him. Their choice. Neil built Edward's cabin for him. He taught Cole to print his negatives. He worked almost side by side with Brett for many years. Brett gave up two years of his own life to print almost 6,500 prints for him as well as the 50th Anniversary Portfolio. Chandler, the oldest was not as close. Edward was closer to his sons, from what I have seen, than about 99% of fathers are to their sons today. His work and his sons, equqlly, came first. Per Nancy Newhall, "The ladies came last."

    So, Francesco, I think you are misreading whatever it is you are reading. And, I think that you do not know the whole story. There was a time when he was away, but only for three years when he went to Mexico--but he came back for six months in the middle of those there years for one reason: to be near his sons. And he wrote often about caring for his sons. On one of his trips to Mexico he took Chandler. On the second trip, he took Brett.

    Question for you: Do you think it would have been better had he not gone to Mexico? I don't. Yes, he would have been with his all of his sons for that time , but he would have been miserable. That inner misery would, in my opinion, have brought resentment and in the long run he and his sons would not have been as close as they were. If one is the best one can be for oneself, one can be better and more "there" for others. Sure, there was hurt for a few years, but in the long run everyone, and most especially his sons, was better for his time in Mexico.

    Another interesting note. Every day, including up to the late 1940s and 1950s Edward sent a penny postcard to his sister, May, in Ohio. It was May who got him to come to California in the first place back in 1905 and who, more or less had raised him after his mother died when he was young. So, Edward really was a family man, in all regards, much more than most.

    Someone brought up Ansel Adams. Ansel Adams was a son-of -a bitch to his wife and kids. He neglected his kids totally, and he neglected his wife, too. It is my understandings that as an adult, his son Michael barely and rarely spoke to him.

    Think about it. In Weston's Daybooks, Edward often mentions his sons. In Adams's autobiography, I don't believe they are mentione at all, or if they are it is only in passing. He really had nothing to do with them.

    These misreadings of and myths about Edward Weston are sorry distortions of who the man was. When he died, Ansel Adams said about him, "Once there was a great man who was also a photographer." And from my having known many people who knew Edward, I have never heard a different take on him as a person as well as as a photographer.

  10. #50

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Düsseldorf, Germany
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,021
    Images
    1
    I stand corrected.
    Francesco



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin