Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,525   Posts: 1,543,902   Online: 1042
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,179
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    I have read an authoratitive Mapplethorpe biography that claims he never processed a film or made a print, this was all done by Tom Baril as Tom Duffy has suggested.
    I've never seen any of his black and white work which I consider any great shakes, but his color prints were breathtaking. Who did that superb dye transfer work? I would find it hard to believe that the photographer was not involved in producing those prints. They're just too good.

  2. #12
    Domenico Foschi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    440
    Images
    46
    In the Biography by Patricia Morrisroe titled "Mapplethorpe" the author objectively reveals an artist with many defects , very little virtues as a human being , and as an artist a person who considered the printing stage of his work a waste of time .
    He would actually stress more in the frame and matt choices, then else.
    Tom Baril was his printer , luckily for Mapplethorpe who was detested by the former .
    Personally i find it hard to say that M. wasn't a good artist , because his compositions were flawless, his good taste unique and his lighting was masterful. The courage to push the envelope and speaking from the heart was no doubt his main strength.
    For prints sales, workshops and individual lessons,
    please, check my website



    My APUG Portfolio
    http://www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=196<p>

  3. #13
    Les McLean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Northern England on the Scottish border
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,610
    [quote="Domenico"]In the Biography by Patricia Morrisroe titled "Mapplethorpe" the author objectively reveals an artist with many defects.

    This is the book that I referred to in my earlier post, thanks for posting this Domenico, I loaned my copy to someone a few years ago and lost it and I want to purchase another but had forgotten the name of ther author.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    91
    Images
    11
    Today I ran across the book referenced below and it is entitled "Portrait: Theory" ISBN number 0912810343.

    --Philip.

    Quote Originally Posted by felipemorgan
    I apologize for not being able to cite my source here, but it was a book I checked out some time ago from the library called, I think, "Portraits" or "The Portrait" or the like. It profiled several photographic portrait artists including Mapplethorpe. The salient details I'm remembering are:

    Hasselblad w/ 150mm lens, Tri-x (probably exposed@200), Rodinal 1:25 or 1:50, subjects lit with two umbrella'd strobes, and printing sometimes done with pantyhose material stretched over the enlarger lens for slight diffusion.

    Beautiful simplicity!

    --Philip.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    171
    His platinum prints were done by Martin Axon. Axon printed some on linen or canvas. I saw one in an exhibit at the St. Louis Art Museum years ago, a calla lilly printed in platinum on linen, stunning.

  6. #16
    Helen B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen, New York, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,557
    Images
    27
    'Portrait: Theory' came out in '81. It was one of an excellent short 'Theory' series published by Lustrum Press. I don't know how many there were altogether, but I have Portrait, Landscape, Darkroom and Darkroom 2.

    Bare details from the book:

    Philip's memory is correct regarding the details, though I can't find a specific mention in the book of the make of camera. He does say that he did not bracket exposures, and that he didn't do his own printing. He used semi-matte Ilfobrom or, for dark-skinned people, the warmer-toned Portriga Rapid.

    He only owned two lenses: an 80 mm and a 150 mm. He considered the 80 to produce too much distortion, and liked having a lot of space between himself and the sitter - so much so that they often couldn't hear his quiet voice.

    He learned about lighting by buying a couple of Lowell quartz lights and doing still-lifes. He preferred daylight over flash and tungsten, but was happy to use all three, and found switching between them to be a good thing.

    The '79 portrait of William Burroughs in his loft was taken using tungsten lights. RM remarks that using tungsten had taught him to create strong shadows artificially, and that he wouldn't have had such a strong shadow with daylight or tungsten.

    The '78 portrait of Patti Smith holding her neck brace was also lit by tungsten, and RM adds that it was shot at f/16 - the aperture he liked to use.

    The '80 portrait of Jennifer Jacobsen holding her breasts was printed with a stocking over the enlarger lens.

    The '80 portrait of John Ford (painter) in the bath was also tungsten.

    The '80 portrait of Claudia Summers was taken with a single strobe bounced off an umberella.

    The '80 portrait of Terry Beans was made with two strobes.

    Best,
    Helen

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin