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Thread: Master printers

  1. #1
    Gustavo_Castilla's Avatar
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    Master printers

    I saw the print at the Getty wen I last visit the museum ( small Trades by Irvin Penn)
    there in the smaller gallerie was this wonderful collection of prints !
    Man Ray , Dogson ,Henry Peach Robinson ,Henry Peach Robinson
    So I ask if you can tell us about your choises of printmakers !
    Yes Avedon and Newtton made great work but left the printing to others !



    Henry Peach Robinson
    b. 1830, d. 1901
    photographer
    British




    Albumen print from six negatives
    22 1/16 x 29 5/16 in.
    84.XM.898

    "It was soon evident in my lodgings that I had become a dangerous lunatic, and there would be nothing left to destroy if strong measures were not taken. So I was turned out of the house, but it was only into the garden, where I was allowed to build a small darkroom of oilcloth."
    Henry Peach Robinson described his passionate enthusiasm for photography in these dramatic terms. He learned photography from Dr. Hugh Diamond's instructions, which had been printed in the Journal of the Photographic Society. In 1857 Robinson abandoned the bookselling trade and opened a photographic studio, specializing in portraits. Like his friend and colleague Oscar Rejlander, Robinson made combination prints, joining multiple negatives to create a singe image. He adopted a picturesque aesthetic from painting, finding the simplest object to be a worthy subject for artistic rendering. Like many early photographers, Robinson had to give up darkroom work at age thirty-four because of a nervous condition brought on by exposure to toxic photographic chemicals. Robinson continued an active involvement in photography. He wrote the influential Pictorial Effect in Photography, Being Hints on Composition and Chiaroscuro for Photographers, first published in 1868. In 1891 Robinson and several others formed the Linked Ring, a society of photographers who had grown disillusioned by the photographic establishment as represented by the Photographic Society. He eventually succumbed to the poisonous effects of photographic chemicals. ,
    b. 1830, d. 1901
    photographer
    British


    "It was soon evident in my lodgings that I had become a dangerous lunatic, and there would be nothing left to destroy if strong measures were not taken. So I was turned out of the house, but it was only into the garden, where I was allowed to build a small darkroom of oilcloth."
    Henry Peach Robinson described his passionate enthusiasm for photography in these dramatic terms. He learned photography from Dr. Hugh Diamond's instructions, which had been printed in the Journal of the Photographic Society. In 1857 Robinson abandoned the bookselling trade and opened a photographic studio, specializing in portraits. Like his friend and colleague Oscar Rejlander, Robinson made combination prints, joining multiple negatives to create a singe image. He adopted a picturesque aesthetic from painting, finding the simplest object to be a worthy subject for artistic rendering. Like many early photographers, Robinson had to give up darkroom work at age thirty-four because of a nervous condition brought on by exposure to toxic photographic chemicals. Robinson continued an active involvement in photography. He wrote the influential Pictorial Effect in Photography, Being Hints on Composition and Chiaroscuro for Photographers, first published in 1868. In 1891 Robinson and several others formed the Linked Ring, a society of photographers who had grown disillusioned by the photographic establishment as represented by the Photographic Society. He eventually succumbed to the poisonous effects of photographic chemicals.

    Henry Peach Robinson
    b. 1830, d. 1901
    photographer
    British


    "It was soon evident in my lodgings that I had become a dangerous lunatic, and there would be nothing left to destroy if strong measures were not taken. So I was turned out of the house, but it was only into the garden, where I was allowed to build a small darkroom of oilcloth."
    Henry Peach Robinson described his passionate enthusiasm for photography in these dramatic terms. He learned photography from Dr. Hugh Diamond's instructions, which had been printed in the Journal of the Photographic Society. In 1857 Robinson abandoned the bookselling trade and opened a photographic studio, specializing in portraits. Like his friend and colleague Oscar Rejlander, Robinson made combination prints, joining multiple negatives to create a singe image. He adopted a picturesque aesthetic from painting, finding the simplest object to be a worthy subject for artistic rendering. Like many early photographers, Robinson had to give up darkroom work at age thirty-four because of a nervous condition brought on by exposure to toxic photographic chemicals. Robinson continued an active involvement in photography. He wrote the influential Pictorial Effect in Photography, Being Hints on Composition and Chiaroscuro for Photographers, first published in 1868. In 1891 Robinson and several others formed the Linked Ring, a society of photographers who had grown disillusioned by the photographic establishment as represented by the Photographic Society. He eventually succumbed to the poisonous effects of photographic chemicals.
    Gustavo Castilla
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    Tony Egan's Avatar
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    I found the printing of the small trades exhibition not to my taste. Far too contrasty and too many prints with no highlight detail in critical areas. A few of the platinum prints had a satisfying full tonal range that I enjoyed but it was more like an assault rather than a delight to the senses for me. Some have speculated that diminishing eyesight causes some printers to up the contrast as they age. I have heard this said of Ansel Adams about his later work.
    I saw a portraits exhibition of Cartier-Bresson work a few years ago that I thought was outstanding in terms of quality of large enlargements from 35mm negatives. I'll have to check the catalogue to see who did those.

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    Gustavo_Castilla's Avatar
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    To my knowledge Cartier-Bresson did not made the bulk of his prints I could be wrong of course will check on it !

    O.K. I have it from an excellent source that Henry only printed up to the 1940's after that other people printed for him so In my book that puts him out for the purpose of this here thread
    Last edited by Gustavo_Castilla; 01-29-2010 at 09:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Gustavo Castilla
    We are not moved by things ,
    but by the views we take of them.
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    df cardwell's Avatar
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    So I ask if you can tell us about your choises of printmakers !

    PH Emerson.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #5
    Gustavo_Castilla's Avatar
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    Mine?
    sure early Steichen , Nadar , Edward Weston Emerson, Carlton Watkings , Paul Outerbridge, Ruthie Berhard ,Bellocq , White , Ted Orland , Francis Sommer ,Nègre,Julia Margaret Cameron
    Gustavo Castilla
    We are not moved by things ,
    but by the views we take of them.
    Epictitus.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Egan View Post
    I found the printing of the small trades exhibition not to my taste. Far too contrasty and too many prints with no highlight detail in critical areas.
    If you're familiar with Penn's style, he encompassed multitudes during his career, but his signature style in silver was often slightly on the contrasty side. You either like it or you don't...I happen to love it.

    There's nothing that says a print has to include all the zones evenly distributed...

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    Davec101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PVia View Post
    If you're familiar with Penn's style, he encompassed multitudes during his career, but his signature style in silver was often slightly on the contrasty side. You either like it or you don't...I happen to love it.

    There's nothing that says a print has to include all the zones evenly distributed...
    In terms of contemporary photographers i rate Kenro Izu as one of the finest platinum printers in the world. His platinum prints are a sight to behold, every time i see them in person they take my breath away. A true master printer.



    I too must admit, having seen some of Penn's small trade platinum prints they were on the contrasty side, however others I have seen have a beautiful range of tones.
    Last edited by Davec101; 01-30-2010 at 07:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Platinum Printing Editions http://www.dceditions.com
    The Art of Platinum Printing Blog http://artofplatinum.wordpress.com/
    Alternative Photographic Processes blog http://altphotoblog.com/



 

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