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  1. #41

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Ventura, California
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    Quote:
    [This image, for example, http://www.kunsthaus.ch/struth/en/, of a famous cliff face (El Capitan? Half Dome?) with tourists seems like a nice wry comment on A. Adams's heroic landscape work, but that's all it seems to be other than well-executed.]

    My question, in the context of art here:
    Why would you buy that photo? Where would you put it? Would you want to look at it every day? I can understand the making of it. I can understand trying to get a point across. But that "point" portrays little beauty in my mind. I would therefore not purchase that print to hang on my wall, or prop up on a table in my library, etc. Hope I'm making sense...

  2. #42

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    Jun 2003
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    i don't know

    seems every bit as interesting ( or even more so ) as "the famous-one" ..

  3. #43
    jovo's Avatar
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    Feb 2004
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    Jacksonville, Florida
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    Because my wife is an exceptionally fine professional artist (oils and pastels), I have a somewhat greater regard for Struth than I otherwise might. Painters (realist, but painterly) will regard just about any subject as worthy. They then juggle value, balance, and a host of other criteria when making their work. We are all rather likely to appreciate a well done painting of nearly anything because we recognize the skill it took to make. We are far less generous about a comparably random photographic subject because it seems to require an explanation to validate its very existence, though no such blather needs to attend a painting. When I look at photographs with the same equanimity that I do paintings, I feel much greater sympathy (although not necessarily more fondness!) for whatever the lens has captured if it "works" in the way a painting would.
    John Voss

    My Blog

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