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  1. #11

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    Rick, I love your story about Greer Garson and Ansel.

  2. #12
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    PM sent but thought I would share it here as well.

    1. What is your name? (Screen name is OK too)
    Christopher Walrath

    2. Explain how you discovered photography.
    As with most people I have been taking pictures for most of my life. I really started to take it seriously in the late eighties with yearbook, using my mother's Minolta X-700. Later, she started a wedding photography business so I helped out by mimicking her shots so she would have a copy of the negs.

    I didn't realize what my photography could be until on an overnighter in Nags Head with my father. We went to the Bodie Island lighthouse and I made some photographs of it amongst others from the weekend. When I went to get the prints, I found that someone had stuck a photograph in with them. I looked at the photograph. I realized that I could make photographs as well as any of the masters and before me was the proof. And to this day, I think I have seen perhaps two photographs that I thought were as good as my photograph of that light.

    3. How does film and other analogue processes and products affect you and your photography?
    I am not certain the film affects my photography so much as defines it. There is no certain look or feel that I am going for in my photography. I have always used film. It is an old friend that I do not see myself ever turning my back on. It has always been there and I think it always will be there in the future. I know how to coax the most for my negs when souping film in the tank. And I am always learning how to bring along the most expressiveness in my printing. I am sure this can be done with digital. It is being done.

    I liken it to golf. I am left handed. I golf right handed. A few years ago I was toying with thinking about re-learning to golf left handed so I could get what might be considered the best potential from my game. But why re-learn for years what I already knew and loose all of that time to improve that which I knew. So I just kept on as I was already going.

    4. What is your opinion of the "Digital Revolution"?
    Ansel Adams looked forward to 'electronic capture' as he stated it in an interview years ago. I am certain that some of the masters would have been excited and thrilled at the prospect of being able to put down the brush just once to see just what this new fandangled paper coated with suspended silver salts could do.

    There are many who bash digital photography as a bastard son just as there were those in Picasso's time who damned photography for trying to replace painting by making imagery more simple. There are still brushes and acrylics and oils and canvas. In a hundred years there will be film and papers and enlargers. Albeit on a lesser scale and I beleive in a more niche market than in the past.

    Digital has been put to some good uses. Digital mammography, replacing the pain for women getting examinations. This is but one awesome example of the possibilities. Digital photography is still photography. The tools are different but, when the chips are down, it is still a simple case of e=i(t), isn't it?

    5. Do you believe that analogue photography will continue to exist in the future?
    I think I already answered that. But I will rehash it a little. I think that analogue photography will be in a lesser niche market and that the larger camera houses will embrace digital capture and processes wih increasing frequency. This will leave smaller companies, such as Harman Tech, to pick up the slack and they will thrive with the reduction of choices available to film photographers. Photographers and their suppliers will create a tighter bond and I beleive, albeit on a smaller scale, film photography will thrive in it's little old corner of the world.

    6. Any comments, stories, tips, you would like to share?
    If anyone is truly curious about analog photography, take a camera, shoot a roll, find someone with a darkroom, soup the film and make some prints with guidance. This is the totality of analog photography and without this completion you will not know what you are missing and, perhaps, make an uninformed decision to stick with digital.

    If you do the above, you may still find you prefer digital processes, but you can't know what you lost if you never had it in the first place. You never know, you just might get hooked. And that would be a grand thing indeed.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  3. #13

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    1. What is your name? (Screen name is OK too)

    Moopheus

    2. Explain how you discovered photography.

    In a shoebox? Not sure, but I think the first cameras I had for my own was given to me when I was 7 or 8, and I'm pretty sure I was in the darkroom by the time I was 10.

    3. How does film and other analogue processes and products affect you and your photography?

    My photography is mostly analog. It is for various reasons—inertia for one—I've always done it that way. I like the process—I enjoy messing with the cameras, the film, the chemicals. Making prints in the darkroom. It's fun, and mentally engaging in a way that other stuff I have to do isn't. I like cooking for similar reasons—I enjoy the process, and the satisfaction of good results. I find it a relief to have a way to step back from the computer and just make things with my hands. Plus I am contrarian by nature—when everyone else is rushing off the cliff, I will gladly stand by and wave at them as they go by.


    4. What is your opinion of the "Digital Revolution"?

    It is, like most things, a mixed blessing. There are benefits, but new technologies are rarely perfect substitutes for old (one of the reasons old technologies take a while to die), and the benefits don't come free; there is a cost. It's not just photography, of course—the digital has affected everything. I work in publishing and I'm old enough to remember making layouts with waxing machines and type from a phototypesetter—which themselves had replaced Linotypes. Now I can make a book in a weekend, and it doesn't even need to be printed anymore. At my day job, we hardly handle paper any more. But I've had my hands on a Bruce Rogers lectern bible—something real has been lost. For photography, it's not that hard to understand why people who mainly used instamatics on holidays and saved their photos in shoeboxes might prefer digital cameras. I think, though, if you want to do something nice, have a little art in it, you have to engage in your medium, feel and understand how it works. Painters do it, musicians do it. For myself, I find that easier to do with film and paper.

    (answers to 3 & 4 somewhat overlap)

    5. Do you believe that analogue photography will continue to exist in the future?

    Probably in some form, at least in the short term. In the long term, who knows? The future is a long time. I think we will be lucky to get through the next 100 years with some remnant of human civilization. There is a good chance we will not fix the big problems before they are unfixable, and find that Malthus was right after all. But photography as we know it is an invention of the industrial age. It involves complex machines, a high level of understanding of optics, and sophisticated chemical processes. It requires a fairly sophisticated industrial infrastructure to support it. Our equipment supply is getting older and harder to repair, and not being replenished in any significant number. Sure, a small number of people could continue something we could call photography for a fairly long time with jerry-rigged and homemade solutions as long as they can get certain basic supplies, but it wouldn't be surprising to me at all if the industrial product disappears completely within my own lifetime.

  4. #14
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    1. What is your name? (Screen name is OK too)

    Klainmeister

    2. Explain how you discovered photography.

    I was handed a Canon Eos 35mm by my father and began taking BW pictures of friends and my punk rock band at a young age. I went thru a period of deaths, in which 6 people close to me in almost perfectly timed annual increments past away. Ever since, the physical attribute of film over digital makes those "captured moments" truly timeless. They possess a special place.

    3. How does film and other analogue processes and products affect you and your photography?

    It's all about process. I do landscape, so the analogue medium does not grant me the instant satisfaction of digital. I could be thousands of miles away from home and never know if the picture is what I 'saw'. The process is a journey, just as getting to a location for the shot itself. It's a philosophical disposition.

    4. What is your opinion of the "Digital Revolution"?

    It's great in many ways. It has brought photography back into the realm of the people and hobbyist. It has spurred a whole new generation of photographers and has essentially democratized the photographic publication industry. The downside, of course, is sometimes these are superficial ideas and the reality of some of the photographs being taken might as well be stealing the internal essence of a place. When I see someone claiming to be a 'pro' walk up, snap 200 shots handheld at sunset, walk back to his car and drive off, I sometimes wonder not what the customer is missing, but what he is missing. That was, and continues, to be the biggest issue with digital--lack of contemplation and process.

    5. Do you believe that analogue photography will continue to exist in the future?

    Yes.

    6. Any comments, stories, tips, you would like to share?

    I firmly believe that those continuing analog photography go out taking pictures, but ultimately, it is not the photograph they are after.

  5. #15
    mjs
    mjs is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Harmon View Post
    1. What is your name? (Screen name is OK too)

    Michael Sherck

    2. Explain how you discovered photography.

    As a child I discovered that the asphalt driveway next to our house looked very much like the surface of the Moon as photographed by the Apollo astronauts so I would pour a little puddle of gasoline and light it. When it burned out I'd place small plastic astronaut figures and models of the Apollo lunar landers next to my "crater" and photograph them with my Kodak 126 cartridge camera (with flashcubes!) The resulting pictures looked, to me anyway, astonishingly lifelike.

    3. How does film and other analogue processes and products affect you and your photography?

    Growing up in the pre-digital world, film was photography. To me, a "photograph" requires film. Digital is... something else. Digitography, or something, perhaps. Not lesser, not better, just different.

    4. What is your opinion of the "Digital Revolution"?

    I'm all for it! As an amateur astronomer I greatly appreciate the application of digital cameras and image processing techniques to astro-photography. But for my own personal work, I'm monumentally uninterested. I've been a computer programmer, IT manager, etc. for more than 30 years now: when I go home I don't want to sit in front of a computer monitor any more. I want to go to my darkroom and stand in the quiet dark, alone with my thoughts and my images.

    5. Do you believe that analogue photography will continue to exist in the future?

    Yes. Just as photography didn't kill off painting or etching, so the digital revolution won't kill off film. It will become a niche and therefor more expensive, but even if the worm turns full 'round and "analog" goes back to meaning pouring wet plates, as it started, it will still be practiced. I certainly don't see film based photography ending in my lifetime and I truly believe, ever.

    6. Any comments, stories, tips, you would like to share?

    The other day my wife and I visited our local camera store and my wife pointed to a display of photographer's vests and asked whether I wanted one. I wrinkled up my nose and said no, that they were too dorky and nerdy. Her mouth dropped open and her eyes opened wide in amazement. "You use that great big 8x10 thing and you're worried about looking like a dork?" she said, laughing.

    Thank you for spending your time to help me out with my project. I truly appreciate it.

    If this is in the wrong forum please move it or delete it.
    I want to personally thank the promoters of the "digital revolution" for making film equipment affordable to persons of small means, such as myself. The availability of film cameras, lenses, enlargers, etc. has meant that I could try, and adopt, formats which were formerly too expensive for me to consider, such as 4x5 and 8x10.

    Mike
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming– “Wow! What a Ride!”

    — Hunter S. Thompson

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