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  1. #21

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    Along the lines of 2F/2F's suggestion, find an under-served market and start doing it. Mostly this means clients that don't have the money to hire full-time established pros. Unfortunately, this also means your rates are low. But it gets you the into the "learning experience", builds your portfolio of work that you can begin showing to clients that can pay better. And it gives you the experience of learning to accurately estimate jobs.

    For me, this was doing a lot of work photographing custom furniture that fellow Art Department students were building for clients. They needed good photography of their work, but didn't have lots of money to spend. Some of my work from that time was published in Fine Woodworking magazine (accidentally uncredited though )

    So, you could try looking to small businesses that want/need to improve the photography in their visual promotions, either on-line stuff or brochures and such.
    Pottery, woodworking, stained glass artisans, perhaps painters too, but their needs don't rely so much on presenting a product in a setting or with flattering light.
    Etc.

  2. #22
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Here's one think I found shooting products. The the best job you can for great clients and you'll get more work through word of mouth. You'll have to shoot products that is manufactured or grown in your region. Chances are, you'll have to shoot digital and do post production work. Don't short change yourself by working for cheap. It will only get cheap clients because you'll be know as the "cheap" photographer. It's hard to raise your rates if you're the cheap one. Don't be afraid to lose some bids. If you're getting every bid, you're rates are probably too low. Again, I suggest assisting for a photographer that has a good reputation to get to know the business.

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