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Thread: EDDIE ADAMS

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    harveyje's Avatar
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    EDDIE ADAMS

    I just read in a short news article that Eddie Adams, Pulitzer Prize winner, died today in NYC. He took the picture of the shooting of a VC officer in public which caused significant controversy in the press.
    John Harvey
    Colorado Springs, CO
    harveyje@usa.net

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    a few links i rounded up:

    nyt obituarary
    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/20/arts/20adam.html

    speaking about war photography
    http://www.newseum.org/warstories/in.../bio.asp?ID=22

    eddie: than and now - a short video
    http://www.pixchannel.com/adams_hi.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by harveyje
    I just read in a short news article that Eddie Adams, Pulitzer Prize winner, died today in NYC. He took the picture of the shooting of a VC officer in public which caused significant controversy in the press.
    Certainly, with that one shot, he made photographic history. IMO this one and the series from SMith about the mercury poison in Japan are about the most memorable pictures of the 20th century. Oh, and I guess the NG afghan girl too.

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    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Certainly, with that one shot, he made photographic history. IMO this one and the series from SMith about the mercury poison in Japan are about the most memorable pictures of the 20th century. Oh, and I guess the NG afghan girl too.
    I would add the flag raising on Iwo Jima by Joe Rosenthal to that list.

    I haven't read any of the links provided in this thread yet, but I vividly remember reading an interview with Eddie a year or so ago. He did not like his Pulitzer Prize photo and had never hung it on the wall. Most of all, he hated how it was taken out of context and how it became an icon of the Anti-War movement. Eddie was there and had witnessed the situation develop. I forget exactly what had happened, but Eddie always said the shooting was fully justified. Idealogues on the other side made into an example of a corrupt and brutal regime executing an "innocent freedom fighter".

    Eddie had not gone looking for such a situation with the thought capturing a Pulitzer Prize winner. In contrast, the fellow who took the shot of the little girl running down the road on fire, did go purposely looking for a situation. What galls me the wrong way is that he did not drop his camera and do something to help the girl. Instead, he let her run by, on fire, knowing he has a Prize-candidate shot. There is film-footage taken at the incident showing this, and the photographer has stated his motivation in several interviews.
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    I really respect Adams. I respected him even more when he gave his reasons for giving up war photography. He goes into this on pixchannel.com.

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    [/QUOTE]I haven't read any of the links provided in this thread yet, but I vividly remember reading an interview with Eddie a year or so ago. He did not like his Pulitzer Prize photo and had never hung it on the wall. Most of all, he hated how it was taken out of context and how it became an icon of the Anti-War movement. Eddie was there and had witnessed the situation develop. I forget exactly what had happened, but Eddie always said the shooting was fully justified. Idealogues on the other side made into an example of a corrupt and brutal regime executing an "innocent freedom fighter".

    Eddie had not gone looking for such a situation with the thought capturing a Pulitzer Prize winner. In contrast, the fellow who took the shot of the little girl running down the road on fire, did go purposely looking for a situation. What galls me the wrong way is that he did not drop his camera and do something to help the girl. Instead, he let her run by, on fire, knowing he has a Prize-candidate shot. There is film-footage taken at the incident showing this, and the photographer has stated his motivation in several interviews.[/QUOTE]


    In an interview Adams said that the South Vietnamese officer had just had his family killed by that Viet Cong fighter earlier in the day. He also said that the photograph unfairly painted an image around the officer who ended up fleeing to America and dying here. While this image taken out of context is powerful, it is also powerful even in the context of the situation at hand.
    As for the photograph taken of the napalmed girl mentioned... is it not just as important to know when to put the camera down as it is to know when to pick it up?? Have we as image makers thrown our humanity away just to take a picture in those situations?
    Ray
    Do not question what you have not done, question what you will not try.

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    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happysnapper
    As for the photograph taken of the napalmed girl mentioned... is it not just as important to know when to put the camera down as it is to know when to pick it up?? Have we as image makers thrown our humanity away just to take a picture in those situations?
    Ray
    That's exactly my point Ray. The photographer had an agenda to fullfill - seek out an incident in the war showing its brutality that would advance his own position - and that of his agenda - and then call the soldiers the criminals - while the photographer stands by and lets the girl burn until a group of the "criminal" soldiers came to her aid. So, who's the criminal in that situation?
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    Most certainly both parties were criminal in their actions and we are witnessing history repeating itself as a leader of a powerful nation is determined to force his will on a "lessor and uncivilized" nation. So, who should stand at that war crimes trial?
    Ray
    Do not question what you have not done, question what you will not try.

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    The guy who took the picture of the Vulture over the Ethiopian baby, in the eighties, never could live with what he did to get that photo. He said he waited for an hour or so while that child just laid there. He knew the vulture would come over. Before he comitted suicide he made a rather pointed statement towards those photographers who do not put down the camera, as he should have done in that instance. He used himself as the example of how not to be.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

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    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happysnapper
    Most certainly both parties were criminal in their actions and we are witnessing history repeating itself as a leader of a powerful nation is determined to force his will on a "lessor and uncivilized" nation. So, who should stand at that war crimes trial?
    Ray
    Now, now Ray, lets leave the political inferences out of this like Sean has decreed. We are simply discussing Eddie Albert's ethical stand on the photo that made him famous and contrasting that behavior to that of a contemporary of his. No World Hunger solutions involved.
    Last edited by Alex Hawley; 09-20-2004 at 04:47 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
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