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Thread: Adams and HDR

  1. #21
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I don't think HDR is necessarily bad. Before the digital photography, photographers tried to recreate what the human eyes see. Film doesn't have the same dynamic range as our eyes. On any photo or movie set you'll see grip equipment with shiney boards to fill in shadows and flags to shade off hot highlights. Adams also tried to control contrast. The Zone system allows previsusalization and control contrast. Digital HDR is convenient way to control contrast. The drawback of course is photographers going to far with it. I'm not sure if it's true or not, but there was HDR done with multiple shots with film and printers were able to combine different parts through pre-press offset lithography process.

  2. #22
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Good point Maine. Hand colored prints can be very nice if not overdone.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximusM3 View Post
    Bresson's images stand on their own. Adams' do not. Bresson was a great photographer, Adams was a great processor. I like both for different reasons but, again, Adam's work without his sometimes outlandish renditions at printing stage, would certainly not be as exciting, to say the least.
    With all due respect I think it would make slightly more sense for you to say in your opinion Bresson's images stand on their own and that Adams's do not, rather than stating it as fact. Personally I never cared much for most of Bresson's so-called decisive moments. I think a few of them are excellent. And I think that is the point. The best of Adams's images stand on their own just as well as the best of Bresson, or the best of anyone else for that matter. And people might also change their tunes if they saw some of Adams's earlier printings, which are typically quieter and more subtle. Perhaps not. Furthermore, it is unfortunate late printings of crowd favorites like Moonrise, and Moon and Half Dome dominate Adams's artistic output, and are therefore often held up as examples of how Adams was simply a skilled technician, rather than a photographer. Nonsense. In my opinion the best of his images are some of the very best photographs ever created - and they succeed despite the negatives having actually been subject to rather severe processing errors. Adams's images are often criticized because so many people have copied them, the original vision has become boring to people.

  4. #24

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    Google Talk

    This reminds me of a Google Talk available on Youtube, entitled "The Ansel Adams Zone System: HDR Capture and Range Compression by Chemical Processing" wherein John McCann (who used to work for Polaroid) explains the Zone System to Google engineers, presumably, and reflects on how digital technology should better utilize this.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Xanb3J81EA

    I stumpled over this by chance, and must say I'm surprised it hasn't had more views. Plenty to learn from it even if you're not interested in bits and bytes, especially if you're a newcomer to the zone system (like me).

  5. #25
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    I will agree that his prints are a revelation when seen up close and personal. As to subject matter, I like a lot of it, some don't like any of it. Photography is a very personal expression, and Ansel took what he liked, so not to everones taste.
    I recall a photo of a creek, I think it was Dogwoods in the rain, very HDR if you like, but I was still impressed by the image. The tonal scale and feeling of light was masterful to say the least. The problem with Digital at the moment is the gross overuse of photoshop tecniques like HDR, but especially sharpness/saturation. Like anything new, the image makers need to mature, see how it is in 10 years time.

  6. #26

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    I suspect that if Adams had lived into the digital era, he would have been a member of JPEG. Remember, he was a consultant to Polariod.

  7. #27
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    Yeah but Polaroid was good stuff.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    But didn't Adams also say that he was excited about the emerging technology of digital in an Interview in the early 80's?
    "I eagerly await new concepts and processes. I believe that the
    electronic image will be the next major advance. Such systems will
    have their own inherent and inescapable structural characteristics,
    and the artist and functional practitioner will again strive to
    comprehend and control them." -- Ansel Adams, in "The Negative", 1981

    He also made similar comments in a BBC interview available on YouTube.

  9. #29
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Personally, I don't think Adams' pictures are anything like what the eye sees, however. Their strength is in the fact that they are not, in fact. They are extreme and fantastic (as in "of or pertaining to fantasy") manipulations that get more to the emotional heart of a subject than a purely literal rendition would (i.e. attempting to render exactly what the eye sees).
    To me, Adams is to photography what Albert Bierstadt is to painting.
    Jim

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