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  1. #11

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    hahaha... Not looking for hours though Some of the places I want to shoot are places I shouldn't be so I will be sneaking in to shoot them. Some will be lit so I know I can get away with 100. Some however will be darker so I know at least 400 for those. I wouldn't mind playing with a hour+ exposure though. It would be interesting.

  2. #12

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    TMAX 100 will give you the finest grain - slightly finer than Acros and with more manageable highlight densities. It is also finer grained than PanF. TMY2 would be a good choice for more speed.

  3. #13
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    If you have not projection printed for some time, I'd start out with some subject matter that would allow exposure within the films reciprocity zone. You will have enough difficulty controlling evenness of development, contrast and getting a grip on exposure to get good printable negatives when starting out. Contrast control in the darkroom and making good prints will not be easy without properly exposed and developed negatives. Controlling "grain" in prints will be farther down the list of things to master.

  4. #14

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    Well, after doing some flickr'ng, I have seen some GREAT night shots with fair amounts of grain using Delta3200 pulled to 1600 but then I have seen some crap too. HP5 pushed to 800 seems pretty clean too! Heck, I just saw HP5 pushed to 3200 and was soft but looked good. I think it is going to be nature of the beast regardless when shooting night photography anyways but it can get bad with digital at times in the higher ISO ranges and that is what I am trying to avoid. I

    I am quite impressed actually with HP5 and I think it would be a good all around film to have in the bag.

  5. #15
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    If you want to push, try TMY2 (probably in XTOL) for that. It pushes just as well as HP5 and has much finer grain. Different characteristic curve though.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenski View Post
    Would I be better to shoot a slow film using long or multiple exposure or go with something high? I know the faster the film the more grain but can anyone give me a hand here?
    If you are using, as you say, a tripod, you'd better use a low ISO film, just like you use low gain on digital. Different films have different behaviours regarding reciprocity failure, I would read data sheets of various material and choose between low ISO films with good reciprocity behaviour. Colour can get complicated because reciprocity failure also means colour shift and some filtration might become necessary. B&W is easier because you only have to adjust exposure.

    So I would start with a film which has good reciprocity characteristics and do some brackets to see how it behaves outside of its linear response range, remembering that with negatives overexposure is always better than underexposure.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  7. #17

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    I wouldn't even think to shoot without a tripod at night. Well, maybe at iso 6400 id shoot handheld but Im trying to avoid the grain. I think what it is going to come down too is just ordering several rolls of film and shooting till I find the right one for me.

    I will take into consideration what was posted here and roll with it. That is one of the best and worst things about shooting film. You have a wide choice!

    Thanks!

  8. #18

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    Another quick question....

    I was reading the facts sheets for film and came across something I do not understand. It said when shooting for more than a 1/2 second, film needs to be exposed longer than the metered time.

    As Im reading the graph and the write up, it is basically saying if I use a meter and I meter it at f16 for 30 seconds, I really need to expose it for 155 seconds. How true is this?

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenski View Post
    Another quick question....

    I was reading the facts sheets for film and came across something I do not understand. It said when shooting for more than a 1/2 second, film needs to be exposed longer than the metered time.

    As Im reading the graph and the write up, it is basically saying if I use a meter and I meter it at f16 for 30 seconds, I really need to expose it for 155 seconds. How true is this?
    Very true.

    It is known as reciprocity failure. It is due to the fact that when the intensity of the light actually reaching the film is reduced to below a certain level, the response of the film to that light becomes less linear.

    All films exhibit this, but in different amounts. Many here on APUG can advise which films exhibit less reciprocity failure.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
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    That is due to the reciprocity failure I mentioned above. In dim light, at long exposures, film loses sensitivity and begins to behave like a film with a lower ISO rating.

    The additional exposure is to compensate for it. It can be done giving more time or by using a larger lens opening to allow more light to strike the film. With color there may also be a color shift, which is corrected by using filtration recommended by the manufacturer. A manufacturer might, for example, specify magenta color correction filtration and additional exposure thus: CC30M, +1 stop. So you would use a CC30 strength magenta color correction filter and open up the lens one stop. No filtration is needed with B+W film, just exposure compensation.

    I don't agree with polyglot that Acros and Provia have no reciprocity failure out to an hour or two at least-though they are very good in that regard, especially Acros. When I say no reciprocity failure to two minutes, that is what is specified by Fuji, with some correction specified beyond that. My own favorite color film for night exposures is Astia, because it has a layer which helps correct for fluorescent light. My city uses compact fluorescent bulbs in my part of town, which has old-fashioned streetlights, and it's difficult to color correct for them because they are not consistent in coloration one to the next. Astia helps with that a lot.

    Incidentally, there is also reciprocity failure with many films with very short exposure times like those from an electronic flash. In a sense, the film doesn't "react" fast enough, and the result is underexposure. With Kodak E100G it's above 1/10,000, if I remember correctly.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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