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  1. #1

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    New to medium format not new to photography. Night time exposure help!

    Hello everyone!

    I am new to Medium format but FAR from new to photography. I grew up with a father who shot for the Cleveland, Ohio fire dept before he became a fire fighter and an Uncle who shot for the Cleveland Plain Dealer (Newspaper) so I have been around good mentors.

    I fooled around in high school with film but stopped. In 2003 I picked up a Digital Canon and have been shooting ever since. I shoot mainly studio work but I do weddings also. I try to stay away from LARGE weddings and stick with the intimate beach weddings as the couples are more relaxed and just ALOT of fun. When the money is right, yeah I will do a large wedding!

    I have just picked up a RZ67 with a 50mm and 127mm lens, Polaroid back, 2x120 backs, waist level viewer, and a winder. I am very excited about shooting film as I have helped process film before just never made my own prints. My dad has a complete dark room at home and I told him NOT to get rid of it as I want his enlargers. I just do not have any room in the Condo I am living at right now but in less than two years I will be transferring and will be looking for a place to set up enlargers.

    My plan is to shoot some boudoir sessions with it, studio work, and commercial work. I know I have PLENTY of light with my Quantum T5d-R's and Photogenic strobes but I do not think I will ever give up digital. I am sure I will supplement my digital with medium format at weddings but can not EVER see dropping digital for the film.

    I redid a bridal shoot for a couple because their "PROFESSIONAL" photographer did horrible on their wedding shoot using medium format. They actually got their negatives from him and I fixed as much as I could by scanning and TRYING to get the exposure right. A close friend of mine had the same problem and I am STILL trying to get his pictures fixed.

    I have done a good amount of research into the camera and lenses but the film kills me! The camera came with the 127mm and I will be getting a 110 and 180 soon just need to find the right price. But the film, Wheeewwww, I just dont know WHERE to start! I have had good luck with Ilford in the past so I think I will stick with it.. I have the Pan F PLUS, HP5 Plus, and Delta 100. What I REALLY want to get into is outdoor night photography and with a digital I set it up on a tripod, ISO 100, and long exposure. NO problems. With Medium Format though, I am a little lost and confused. I want to enlarge to a minimum of 11"x14" but do not want to see ALOT of grain. Would I be better to shoot a slow film using long or multiple exposure or go with something high? I know the faster the film the more grain but can anyone give me a hand here?

  2. #2

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    Welcome to APUG!

    Um... what's A LOT of grain to you? I've shot 35mm Tri-X 400 and enlarged it to 11x14. There isn't a lot of grain there and quite honestly, I don't see it. If you are using 6x7 and proper exposure, I don't think you'll have problems. Beyond that, you'll just have to try it out and see if what you see is to your liking.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

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    Well, I know I can not compare 35mm to MF, its like comparing a APS-C to FF Digital but that is all I know is when it comes to film really is 35mm. I know what 35mm looks like shooting long exposed night shoots and then blowing it up.

  4. #4

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    Enlarging 6x7 film to 11x14 paper is little better than enlarging 35mm film to 5x7 paper. If you take you 35mm film and enlarge it to 5x7 - you can simulate what you can expect. This is not precise because of aspect ratio difference but close. Keep in mind though, you'll be standing farther away when you view 11x14 photographs than looking at 5x7.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG

    It is a bit difficult to answer your question about grain without knowing what you consider to be acceptable or objectionable. That being said, in 6x7 format grain isn't often a problem until you get up into the higher speed films (e.g. Delta 3200) or grainy film+developer combinations (e.g. HP5+ and Rodinal - and maybe not even then).

    Can you point us to something that shows what sort of night time scene and lighting condition you are considering? As a brand new member, your ability to post links is temporarily restricted, but directions on what to "Google" may help us find any examples you might think helpful.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6

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    I am in the military and on deployment so our internet is VERY VERY VERY slow.. It is basically a ISDN line shared with about 300 other people and I can't WAIT to get back home here in a month because of it. Ughhh... Let me see if I can come up with some examples for you to view.

    I am not too worried about exposure as I have a meter to help me with my exposure. I originally was going to bring the digital camera to use it for a meter but thought that is just stupid, Why dont I just pick up meter and then I can use it in the studio so Im not guessing all the time too. Easier and quicker to set up the lights.

  7. #7

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    Welcome to APUG. I hope you enjoy your RZ67.

    Jeff

  8. #8
    lxdude's Avatar
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    For your night shots, use Fuji Acros 100. You'll get fine grain and no need to adjust for reciprocity failure up to two minutes. That should fit right in with what you've already been doing with your digital.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #9
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    Acros or TMY2 for B&W night shots, Provia for colour. Acros & Provia have no reciprocity failure out to about an hour or two at least, TMY2 has maybe half a stop at an hour but it has enough latitude that you can pretty much ignore it. So you'll soak up the most light with TMY2, but it has slightly more grain than the Acros or Provia. However, all three will look grainless at 11x14; the Acros will look grainless out to about 20x24".

    If you want a very smooth (grainless but slightly softer) look, use D76 at 1+1. For even smoother and even less resolution, D76 stock. For a tiny bit of grain and yet more resolution, use XTOL 1+1 or Rodinal 1+50 with either of those B&W films for beautiful results. The XTOL gives you a bit more shadow detail, the Rodinal a bit less.

  10. #10

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    Throw all sense of reason to the winds. Pan f+ in perceptol 1+2! I'm beginning to experiment with this combination myself and I have heard great things about it. You will have very little grain, however, your exposures may stretch into the hours

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