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  1. #11

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    I'm pretty sure Bullock used a lot of Kodak Polycontrast but not sure of developer. He did a lot of experimental work with light, like defractracting thru large chunks of glass. Edna Bullock showed me his studio when I was there visiting and pointed out a large chunk of glass he used. It was a fragment of a lense from a large telescope from an observatory. He held several pattens I believe having to do with solorization.

  2. #12

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    Following on from the Lenswork portfolio , I looked up the man at the local library and borrowed the Apeture - Masters of Photography book on Wynn.
    I have even more respect for the mans vision, especially his abstracts and his printing interpretaions. I could do without the 'child in forest' type work but the rest is awesome. Favourite in the book is driftwood,1951 which shows exceptional light. Limpet is also exceptional.

    Phill
    Last edited by philldresser; 10-22-2004 at 02:59 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Its early
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  3. #13

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    I was fortunate to see several of Wynns contact prints some years ago & they were awesome. In the book "Darkroom" by Lustrum Press, Wynn discusses his darkroom technique, & he states that he used Kodak Polycontrast, along with Agfa Brovira in grades 5 & 6, developed in Amidol.

    Andy

  4. #14

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    I have always found his work to be tremendous. But I think the most inspring thing about him for me is that he did not even start photography seriously untill in his 40s.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  5. #15

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    I believe the image "Driftwood,1951" was the first Wynn Bullock image I ever saw and was really impressed. It was reproduced in a book titled Light Years published by The Friends Of Photography in 1987. I purchased a video tape titled "The Roots of California Photography" narrated by Jack Lemmon which has a nice piece on Wynn Bullock and Edna Bullock. Others include the Westons of course as well as Ansel Adams and more. I purchased my copy from the Monterey Museum of Art last year. Great film

  6. #16
    ann
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    Lenswork has a nice interview about him done with his wife before she died. very nice. It is on a DVD, with a companion disc for audio only. A very good buy, as is Lenswork.

  7. #17

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    I've seen some Bullock prints before receiving the latest Lenswork issue, but the latter motivated me to get one of his books - Wynn Bullock: The Enchanted Landscape - which includes some images that intrigue me technically. Many of the seascape images from 50s - 60s appear to use multiple exposures to achieve a misty/foggy appearance. He was intrigued by the quality of light thru fog/mist ( as well as chunks of glass).

    Multiple exposure technique probably has been around since the results of 1st accidental double exposure encouraged someone to try more; but I haven't seen the technique used by Master photographers on seascapes before Bullock. Since reading Les McLean's book, I've tried the technique with only fair results. Does seem to require a prominent subject that kinda' rises above the mist, ie rocky outcroppings.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  8. #18
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    I am absolutely in awe of this guy. I had taken out the Enchanted Landscape just prior to the Lenswork edition and fell in love with his work. I just can't put the Lenswork down, his images are magnificant.
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    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  9. #19
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    Lens Work Current issue - Mario DiGiroLamo

    Quote Originally Posted by EricR
    I am absolutely in awe of this guy. I had taken out the Enchanted Landscape just prior to the Lenswork edition and fell in love with his work. I just can't put the Lenswork down, his images are magnificant.
    I know we are all talking about Wynn Bullock (and I've purchased one of the Lens Work prints by Bullock) in this thread but I would like to mention that my good friend here in Atlanta, Mario DiGiroLamo, has a portfolio published in Lens Work this month. And for those of you in Atlanta you can go by the Fay Gold Gallery and see some of his work first hand. It will be worth your time!

    Don Bryant

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