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  1. #21
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    On my nightstand I have "Ansel Adams at 100", "Edward Weston: The Last Years in Carmel", and "Brett Weston: Voyage of the Eye". I've thought a lot about all three artists, but rarely in a comparative way. When I look at the AA book, which covers his entire career, I'm struck by the completeness of it...mistakes and all (and there are mistakes; really bad printing decisions made in the 60's and 70's of older work that was far more beautifully rendered.). It leaves me satisfied. On another night, looking at the EW book, I'm struck by the mystery of his work. There's so much to keep coming back to...so many images I think I understand and then see differently at another time. And then there's the BW book which has the most marvelously abstracted images of the three, and the one I would like to most emulate. But I never feel one is better than the other...they're each so individual and different.

    At the coming AIPAD show where everyone's work is sitting in bins and hanging on panels, I'll have another chance to get my annual 'hold the prints in my hand and try not to get drool on them' fix. Can't wait.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  2. #22

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    Comparison?

    Its good that we discuss issues like this here on APUG once and awhile.I'm proud owner of the book: Brett Weston; Master Photographer. Brett will always have a special place in my heart. I truly wonder how much of either of these guys work we have really seen in person. I recall viewing a print AA had made in the 40's. Just a simple 5x7 contact print it was. It was so unlike his other hyped photographs and even though it was tiny had that special glow. Having been involved in LF for over 30 years I know how hard the really BIG landscape stuff is to pull off. It may look easy but its not. Brett had a very personalized view of the world and it shows in his photos. I'm sure that he didn't want to make pictures like his father. He moved much further into the abstract. If it works for you fine;if not then move on! On an aside we as photographers should be always looking and if possible buying prints. That's how we learn. That's how we learn to print. At least that's what I used as a guideline. The greats were great for a reason. Prints are the best textbook anyone could ever find.
    Regards Peter

  3. #23
    lee
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    peter,

    I liked what you said there. Nice going...

    lee\c

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by peters
    Prints are the best textbook anyone could ever find

    Right on man. I just wish I could afford to buy more of them.

  5. #25

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    Thanks!

    Thanks Lee and thanks Matt! That's very nice! I'm still hoping to lead a group for LF when we all meet in Toronto '06. I'm going to make prints to hand out so that people can have a first-hand look at what a fine print looks like.
    Peter

  6. #26

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    I'm fortunate to already have one of Peter's; and good prints, such as his, do inspire both in handling particular subject matter as well as the techniques of making a fine print. Handling/viewing fine prints up close is a necessity for also achieving that next level. Fred Picker made it affordable for other photographers to have one of his prints - a very good tradition.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  7. #27

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    Print

    Doug-funny you should mention about Freds' fine prints that he sold. I think somewhere along the line the quality became terrible because I owned one and it stunk! But from talking to Richard Ritter I believe that whomever was responsible for producing these runs of "fine prints" was actually a blind person.
    Peter

  8. #28
    lee
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    the 3 that I saw were terrible also

    lee\c

  9. #29
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    I too was tricked into purchasing what was described as a Fine Print and it was not even good.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  10. #30

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    Speaking of BW blacks. I own the image attached. Scan can't do it justice, but hopefully you get the idea. These images just have to be held - they take your breath away...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails aaerase1.jpg  

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