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  1. #1

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    2nd contact sheet

    So here is my second contact sheet, I think I did it bit better exposure wise.

    first part :

    Click image for larger version. 

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    on this part I think that the photo on the left should have had 1 stop more ligth, photo on the rigth look nearly ok, what do you guys think ?
    second part :

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is the second sheet I printed, I notice that in some places, where I should see white, I get something like greyish, I think this is my dev that dektol that wasn't good anymore, am I rigth ?

    Clearly the first photo here is overexposed, i think the other could have done maybe with 1/2 stop more.

    for data : T-Max 400 @400 in D76 for 7,5 minutes

    I will try to get a contact sheet printer for 120 as I'd like to have nice looking sheets too.

    On a side note, I was more careful handling the paper so there are no stains from spilled fix on them too...

    Regards and thanks you all for the help and advices

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Your contact sheet may be a little dark, but for a contact sheet it is probably fine, as all you need on a contact sheet is image information. When you start to print the individual negatives you can fine tune exposure and contrast.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3

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    Thanks Clive, I'm still looking for a enlarger that would be good for 6x45 and up to 6x7-9 if possible.
    I see a lot of durst 6xx but I need to do some research on them and see if they will fit my need, (I read that for 6x45 an angled column is better for larger prints).

    Thanks for the feedback.

  4. #4

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    Hi Luc, I'm not sure if this is really the right sub-forum - I thought it was for large-format contacts on older style papers - but it doesn't really matter.

    Have you tried this way of working before? It connects up the stages of making a good negative in a very practical way . . . via the contact sheet.

  5. #5

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    Good Afternoon, Luc,

    As Clive notes above, the main purpose of a contact sheet is simply to let you know which negative(s) may be worth enlarging. Contact sheets are also helpful, however, for making notes about printing data in case you need to come back later for any additional prints from a given negative.

    Being religiously consistent in making contact sheets can be an extremely useful practice. If you always have the enlarger set at exactly the same height, always use the same f-stop, always use the same exposure time, always use the same paper, etc., there will be a lot less need for numerous test strips when printing. A general rule for is to have the unexposed areas of the film get just enough enlarger exposure to be almost indiscernably identical to the paper's maximum black. On my monitor, your first sheet looks about right; your individual negatives look somewhat underexposed.

    By the way, there is no need for a special contact printing device. Just get a sheet of window glass, preferably around 10 x 12 or 11 x 14 inches, to place on top of your negatives. Any glass shop should be able to grind the edges smooth; you may also want to super-glue a couple of handles near the edges.

    Konical

  6. #6

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    Thank you all for the feedback,

    Martin, I just read the link, will have to read it one or twice more to get it and get back to it as I shoot to fully get it, I think the AA "the negative" book would be a good investment

    Cheers,

    Luc

  7. #7

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    Remember the Ansel Adams book contains information over materials that no longer exist and a working method (individually developed sheets of film) that has no comparison to how you are working. There are better, more practical, guides out there.

  8. #8

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    I hadn't tought of that Martin, do you have any recommendations ?



 

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