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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    When I enlarge I always like a big white border to surround the image. So I print 6x8 on 8x10 paper, for example. That looks nice, and I mount the prints using simple photo corners, and overmat with something like 1/2 of the white print border showing.
    How do I accomplish that when I contact print? Ruby lith? Black masking? I haven't found a good way.
    My method is very basic, so please don't laugh. I use the old wooden contact printing frames, spring-back type. Remove the glass from the contact printing frame and pop in a mat-board cut to the proper shape. Insert the glass on top of the mat board. Place the negative on the glass in the proper position and tape two opposite corners with small pieces of tape. Insert your paper, insert the spring-back, and enjoy printing with borders.

    PS: I'm sure you have figured out that the opening in the mat-board should be slightly smaller than the negative being printed. ;-)
    Last edited by DannL; 06-06-2013 at 10:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #52
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Well since I use a roll of 5 inch paper I have to cut them in my darkroom to whatever size I'm looking to mess around with. I have a mini rotary trimmer there as well as a large rotatrim to use afterwards. I found the fastest way to make them was to use a smaller piece of glass and not use a contact frame. My method gives me edge markings and a black border though.

    But I remembered a solution to your problem and looked it up just to double check. In Lootens on photographic enlarging, chap 11 photographic boarder printing, he discusses a simple method of creating a custom sized easel out of cardboard and two strips of card stock in the corner to act as stops for a piece of glass laid on top. Then he makes a mask with that piece of glass ontop using rubber cement and black paper over the whole piece of glass. Your desired photo size say 5x7, would be traced onto that black paper leaving room for the boarder you want. The centeral part is then cut out and the cement cleaned off leaving a simple glass mask. He goes on further about how to make another mask for black boarders with the same rubber cement and black paper on glass method by leaving the center section and cutting a thin strip around the edge.

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  3. #53
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Here are two examples of the stickers that I made.

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    The one on the top is probably the result your trying to get, I made it as a test with the negative held down without glass using the easel blades. It gives it a white border, and is only sharp as the film was very flat naturally. The bottom version is made with glass and a wide black edge that was trimmed off. It's sharper because of the glass. I wouldn't recommend doing what I did with the first version unless you know your easel blades are in very good condition, and your film is flat. I didn't continue with it as sharpness was lacking. You can drop a loupe onto the bottom one and see the tiniest details, the top one looks a bit soft under the loupe.

  4. #54

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    I believe Tillman Crane has masks created by a print shop for a clean edge when coating or exposing pt/pd.
    For Silver Chloride paper, eg Fomalux & Lodima, I use Rubylith for masking. Just cut out the size you want, then tape the sandwich of neg & mask to underside of contact printing glass.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  5. #55
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk View Post
    I believe Tillman Crane has masks created by a print shop for a clean edge when coating or exposing pt/pd.
    For Silver Chloride paper, eg Fomalux & Lodima, I use Rubylith for masking. Just cut out the size you want, then tape the sandwich of neg & mask to underside of contact printing glass.
    That's what I'm thinking about doing. It seems to me that the only way to insure proper 'contact' between paper and negative, while doing 'contact' printing, (to insure sharp prints), is to use a mask of rubylith or maybe even opaque material. (I thought of using the black plastic that printing paper comes in, but am not sure how to get a 100% straight cut since it's so flexible.
    My idea is to cut two pieces of Ruby Lith, like an L-shape, and then overlay them to create any size mask I need, rectangular or square, within the limitations of the contact printing frame, which is 12x16".

    I'm really picky about print presentation, and absolutely want neat, crisp, straight, and clean edges on the paper, since the edge of the white border and print area is displayed in the overmat window. This is going to be interesting. The enlargements will be easy by comparison...
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #56
    marciofs's Avatar
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    I do a lot of contact prints with medium format 6x4.5 and 6x7 frame size negatives. They are charming and attract people closer to it.

    I like to frame it for sales because frame makes it more impressive:

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    It is also more fordable.

    Recently I have photographed more macro because I think it suits very well medium format contact prints.
    Last edited by marciofs; 10-06-2013 at 04:59 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #57

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    I love small prints, and since my enlarger only does 135 I only contact print my 120 and 4x5 negatives at the moment. I found that they look great in my photo album, I am especially fond of the four 6x4.5:s. I also use a Brownie Six-20 E and the 6x9 prints are wonderful.

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  8. #58
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    Printing on 92 year old paper ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael A. Smith View Post
    And about ten years ago she began making 6x6 cm. and 6x7 cm. contact prints. Some of them on very old Azo paper that expired in 1921. These prints are exquisite.
    Assuming that isn't a typo, how on earth is the paper base still white (i.e. no fogging and no yellowing) ?! Was it stored in a salt mine in an inert gas ? Am I the only person amazed by the ability to get exquisite prints from 92 year old photographic paper ?

  9. #59

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    Has anyone done contacts with negs as small as 35mm? That is, a single 35mm frame presented on it's own.

    I've been thinking lately that it could be an interesting challenge.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    Has anyone done contacts with negs as small as 35mm? That is, a single 35mm frame presented on it's own.

    I've been thinking lately that it could be an interesting challenge.
    I haven't, but you'd be in very good company - Andre Kertesz did much of his early work making contact prints from very small negatives.

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