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  1. #1
    Film Guerilla's Avatar
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    8x10 film/paper to 8.5x11

    Hi guys,

    Anyone tried this before? I'm wondering if 8.5x11 would be nice for contact printing 8x10 film or paper. Would you suggest to go 11x14 or it's enough?

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    8.5 x 11 would be fine for contact printing an 8x10 negative. Even 8x10 paper would be fine, although having the extra 1/4" - 1/2" margin would be nice for mounting purposes.

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I agree with Scott, for contact prints it's nice to have a little bit of extra space around the printed area for mounting.
    For example, I contact print my 5x7 negatives on 8x10 paper.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  4. #4
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    I'll amend my comment to say that an 11x14 paper for an 8x10 contact is starting to get into the realm of wasting paper though. 5x7 on 8x10 is very normal - you've got a 1.5" margin all around, which is a nice amount of breathing space, but not so much that you'd be able to use those unprinted margins for something like test strips or even other prints. Not true with an 8x10 on 11x14 paper - give the 8x10 inch print a 1" margin, and then you're still trimming off enough paper to make one and a third 5x7 prints.

  5. #5
    Film Guerilla's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I might get some papers from Adorama to try their FB 8.5x11 for my contact printing. I haven't tried FB yet so i think this is better than getting the 11x14 almost twice the price. I do contact printing on 5x7 paper for 4x5 film/paper negs sometimes even on 16x21cm papers. 5x7 film / paper negs in 8x10 paper. I did cut some watercolour papers for my alt printing. from 5x7, 16x21cm, 8x10 to 9.75x11.75. I just thought that 8.5x11 is too small for 8x10 for margins but i was wrong. i'll get some FB to play with my soon to be 8x10 negs.
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  6. #6

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    My wife, Paula Chamlee, and I trim our prints to the edge and dry mount them. We print 8x10 prints on 8x10 paper.

    Printing an 8x10 print on larger than 8x10 paper is a waste of paper.

    When mounting or overmatting prints one should never allow the paper base to show through around the edges of the picture. If the paper base is white, it will be the brightest thing visible and will draw the viewer's eye away the picture and be a distraction.

    We "float" our photographs in the overmat—leaving about a ¼-inch to 5/16-inch border around the top and sides and a 3/8-inch border on the bottom (to leave room for signing on the mount board).

    If we left a white border around the print we would have to overmat right up to the edge of the print. As photographers we are responsible for every square millimeter of the picture space. As such, we see our photographs right up to the edge. Overmatting right up to the edge would be tedious indeed, as we would not want to make the overmat too large (leaving a hairline of paper showing), or too small, which would cover up the 1/16s and even 1/32s of an inch edges of the prints, covering up crucial elements in the picture space—destroying the carefully-seen proportions that were seen on the ground glass.

    The matte surface of the mount board and overmat because of its non-reflective surface does not detract the eye from the picture.

    If there is a black border around the print, the same consideration applies. We recently had a fellow in our workshop who placed black borders around his prints. His prints were dead. When we covered up the black borders the prints became more alive—as the blacks in his prints began to look black. (Next to his very black borders the blacks in his prints looked gray.)

    An exception to this would be the photographs of Richard Avedon. When he photographs people against a white background, the people are centered and the rest of the space is dead space. By leaving in the black border he energizes that space and enables the viewer's eye to navigate the entire picture space and not get stuck only on the figure.
    So there are no rules, but whether to leave white or black borders showing when prints are presented is an aesthetic decision—one that must be carefully considered.

    Michael A. Smith



 

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