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  1. #31
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcc View Post
    The biggest trays I could use were 16x20". It's also the largest sheets I've ever printed on, and I was constantly worried about creasing the print (I only had 10 sheets — 9 to use, 1 for testing exposure).
    Yeah, paper this size gets expensive, and is a bit more difficult for sure. You still managed fine, in my opinion, and the final product as several 16x20 sheets will be equally impressive as a single sheet. Nobody other than photographers will care.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #32

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    AWESOME !!!

    I think it's already outstanding, but a perfectionist never finishes. here's some input.

    I've recently started a project to print (enlarging) on 42" paper (roll, which i came across inexpensively, albeit rc)... my output would be 42in. x 63in. I've built a faux frame/easel (for $17)

    supplies from Home Dep*t

    1 1/2 baseboard 17ft ($0.69 per ft)
    super glue
    12 large washers 14 cents or so each
    4 nuts to raise 4 washers to same height as others
    12 neodymium magnets 3-4 bucks for tiny ones

    The cheapest natural wooden baseboards are light enough to be held together by the super glue. While i am projecting horizontally, you can do so on the floor, or where ever. you might also be able to get away from buying the magnets and just use a large sheet of plexi? or use large strips of the cheaper magnets around the border... (the tiny neodymium ones are really strong by the way).

    As for chemicals, I've bought 8" large pvc pipes (diy jobo style) and still do this under safelights since i don't have the light-tight caps like jobo or patterson. I also use a cabinet mesh to separate the paper from itself, always starting out with a water wash before starting any actual chemical process. I also use very diluted dektol and go around and separate the mesh from paper manually as it processes as an extra precaution.

    Of course there's always the 'roll through a trough' method, which i don't trust myself with as it involves to much handling of the paper, for this clumsy guy.

  3. #33
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Good to see I'm not the only nutter doing stuff like this (well not yet, but I intend to).

    What I've got so far is a pinhole camera that can fit about 11x14 (possibly bigger, haven't tried yet).
    But paper is paper and paper is slow, and I've got a whole lot of film lying around, 135 and 120. What I intend to do is to cut up the film (maybe 1 or 2 rolls per photo) and tape it to the back of the camera. Proper alignment isn't an aim of this, I intend to have overlaps and gaps between strips of film.
    Of course, I could just scan it and digitally arrange (why not, I've got 20GB of RAM to fill up), but that's boring, I also want to contact-print.

    My question is, what's the best way to hold all the negs in place when contact-printing? Because of the weird alignments when shooting, I'll have to arrange them in the light and hold them in place before upturning onto the paper in the dark.

    I was thinking of clear-plastic-adhesive sheets (we aussies just call it Contact, like you cover schoolbooks with to stop them getting ripped), but then the negative might stick to it too much and the emulsion could peel off and get damaged and such.
    Sticky-taping to a non-adhesive floppy-plastic sheet wight not work, the negs will sag in the middle when I upturn it.
    Taping to a huge sheet of glass would be perfect but fragile.
    Taping to a sheet of perspex might work, but wouldn't the light refract weirdly?
    All of those methods I envisage the 'holder' will interfere with the light (even though it'll be enlargerlight->holder->negatives->paper) to some degree.

    Are there any better ways of holding the negs down properly? How did you go about it?
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  4. #34

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    need help

    I think you need to call in help from Paul Bunyan. I believe he is semi-retired somewhere in your area.

  5. #35
    analoguey's Avatar
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    +Wow.
    The effort it must've taken. And planning -that would be wonderful to hear about.

    Sent from Tap-a-talk

  6. #36
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    Good to see I'm not the only nutter doing stuff like this (well not yet, but I intend to).

    What I've got so far is a pinhole camera that can fit about 11x14 (possibly bigger, haven't tried yet).
    But paper is paper and paper is slow, and I've got a whole lot of film lying around, 135 and 120. What I intend to do is to cut up the film (maybe 1 or 2 rolls per photo) and tape it to the back of the camera. Proper alignment isn't an aim of this, I intend to have overlaps and gaps between strips of film.
    Of course, I could just scan it and digitally arrange (why not, I've got 20GB of RAM to fill up), but that's boring, I also want to contact-print.

    My question is, what's the best way to hold all the negs in place when contact-printing? Because of the weird alignments when shooting, I'll have to arrange them in the light and hold them in place before upturning onto the paper in the dark.

    I was thinking of clear-plastic-adhesive sheets (we aussies just call it Contact, like you cover schoolbooks with to stop them getting ripped), but then the negative might stick to it too much and the emulsion could peel off and get damaged and such.
    Sticky-taping to a non-adhesive floppy-plastic sheet wight not work, the negs will sag in the middle when I upturn it.
    Taping to a huge sheet of glass would be perfect but fragile.
    Taping to a sheet of perspex might work, but wouldn't the light refract weirdly?
    All of those methods I envisage the 'holder' will interfere with the light (even though it'll be enlargerlight->holder->negatives->paper) to some degree.

    Are there any better ways of holding the negs down properly? How did you go about it?
    I taped the negs to each other with small (~1/4 of a thumb nail) weakened gaffers tape. I weakened it by placing a fresh tape on my cotton shirt, which was still sticky enough to hold the negatives in place. The tape was mainly beyond the borders of the paper, so it wouldn't show up on the contact sheet as a white spot (except for one sheet, during at the end of the run and got sloppy). Then I used a 20x24 sheet of 4-5 mm-thick glass to weigh down the film strips.

    I thought about using clear tape, but decided it might leave residue. Then I tried it with the cotton shirt method and it wasn't sticky enough.

  7. #37
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by analoguey View Post
    +Wow.
    The effort it must've taken. And planning -that would be wonderful to hear about.

    Sent from Tap-a-talk
    I haven't had a serious (>3 hours) printing session since. Maybe it traumatized me!

  8. #38

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    If you want to do a "Panorama" version of the same thing I could lend you my Canon FN-100 back and you could do 100 frames per strip! (Or get an older Nikon or Canon 250 exposure back...)

    Duncan

  9. #39
    jcc
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    Quote Originally Posted by frobozz View Post
    If you want to do a "Panorama" version of the same thing I could lend you my Canon FN-100 back and you could do 100 frames per strip! (Or get an older Nikon or Canon 250 exposure back...)

    Duncan
    Thanks for the offer, Duncan!
    After doing some Googling, I stumbled on the Nikon 750-frame F2. Holy cow! I'm trying to digest how to develop a 100' of film, let alone what to photograph with it.

  10. #40
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcc View Post
    Thanks for the offer, Duncan!
    After doing some Googling, I stumbled on the Nikon 750-frame F2. Holy cow! I'm trying to digest how to develop a 100' of film, let alone what to photograph with it.
    Lomo (or other) movie film tank. There are a few websites with different approaches to home processing cine film, so you might see where google takes you with that approach. Another method is to make a drum out of two disks with dowels running between them around the perimeter, and attaching the film emulsion side out at one end, winding it in a spiral to the other end, and fastening it at that end as well, and then process, rotary fashion, in troughs.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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