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  1. #41

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    What settings do folks use for color contact sheets?

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    aRolleiBrujo's Avatar
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  3. #43
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnabbott View Post
    What settings do folks use for color contact sheets?
    I have several color enlargers, each uses a different setting soooooooo.......
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    I have several color enlargers, each uses a different setting soooooooo.......
    How about a Beseler C23 III with color dichronic head.

  5. #45
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    As I remember the numbers for Magenta and Yellow were in the 60-80 range. Cyan 0. It's been a while though. Age and use affect filters so that doesn't mean you'll be close with these. My Saunders is set at Cyan 0, Magenta 125, Yellow 160 right now.

    The numbers are also affected by the film stock you use and any developing idiosyncrasies you may have. You'll have numbers for each film you use when you are done.

    I use a standard sun-lit scene as my baseline. You need to find numbers that get you a "fully corrected" print once.

    Google - beseler subtractive color - these "calculators" are a good tool for finding baseline correction numbers and exposure times within a couple test prints. Generally available on E-bay.

    Also http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from...lter+&_sacat=0

    Once you find your baseline it's not as hard as it sounds and close is good enough for a proof.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSun View Post

    Please let me know if I'm missing something from the contact proof.
    Waste of time in my opinion. On supreme advantage of film over digital is the fact that the interim process has a clearly visible image. A light source and magnifier are the gold standard of negative analysis.

    Why convert your film to an arbitrarily ordered series of charges, invisible to the human eye, and then convert that into some colored lights or spraypaint in order to see it.

  7. #47
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    I do scan so I can have an idea of what is worth to print. Just for it.

    I do it because to set my darkroom (kitchen) takes more time than scan the negative, and I can't wait to see how the images are as soon the negative dries, while I only set the darkroom only once a month, two months or even more depending how often I photograph.

    I actually wouldprefer have a contact print of the rools in my film folder, because sometimes I forget how a photo I took years algo look like and then I scan again. But I always forget to do contact print of the roll before starting working, because of the images in my computer.

  8. #48
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    It's pointless to argue too much over preferred workflows.

    Technical errors or misinformation yes. But heck, I make my living with digital stills, video, retouch, editing... I'm in front of the computer all day... yet I can't imagine using it to catalog negs. That would amaze folks that I work with who think of me as 'the mac guy' with the crazy editing suite.

    I really like folio-folders with negs in sheets and contact prints, folders labeled as to date or project or tests. Negs and contacts in-hand and ready to print.

    But I have a great loupe and a decent sized darkroom with storage, etc., a very lucky luxury (we converted a duplex to one big house so the 2nd kitchen is MINE until we can turn it into a master bath). I certainly feel for anyone in the situation where just making a contact print means hours of setup and teardown!

  9. #49
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    I'm terrible at scanning. Color stuff I can manage OK (because it's my only option) but B&W sucks. I have a nice scanner (Epson V700) and try all the latest software and tricks but I still get awful results with B&W, especially 35mm. I've rejected entire rolls based on scans but then once I printed the contact sheet I end up printing 3-4 negatives from the roll.

    So for me that's the value of contact sheets. That and I can flip through my binder of negatives and refer to the contact sheet stored on the next page when I want to print something.

    The other thing is it takes FOREVER to scan a roll of film. Close to an hour to do a 35mm roll at 2000 dpi. Then you have to import into light room etc. It takes about 3 minutes to expose, develop and fix a contact sheet.

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